FAQs

FAQs

We hope you will find the following list of questions and answers useful.

If you have any further enquiries please email us at info@becon.co.uk

Background to the Proposal

Who is arc21?

Who are the Becon Consortium?

Why are these facilities needed in the arc21 area?

What targets will the plants help Northern Ireland to meet?

What is MBT?

What is EfW?

How much energy will the EfW plant create?

Why are the proposed EfW and MBT plants located on the same site?

Where will the proposed facility accept waste from?

How much waste will the proposed facilities process every year?

Do the proposed facilities conform to the ‘waste hierarchy’?

How will the proposed facilities work?

What will the operating hours be?

Will any ash be left over from the combustion process?

Where is the proposed site?

What types of operations take place on the site?

Why has this location been chosen?

Is the technology proven?

Will the facility smell?

Will it be noisy?

Will the EfW produce harmful emissions?

What about dioxins?

What about the health impact?

What about the vehicles travelling to and from the facility?

How will traffic levels compare to the traffic associated with the quarry’s operations?

What main routes will the site traffic use?

How will you ensure that site traffic will stick to the designated routes and times?

What improvements will be made to local roads?

If I live close to the proposed facilities will I be able to see them?

How tall will the buildings be?

What are they key milestones before the project goes ahead?

When will construction commence?

Who will determine the planning application?

Will the local community be consulted?

How much will the facilities cost?

How many jobs will the proposed facilities create?

How will the project benefit the local area?

People are worried about the effect of these facilities on their house values. How can you assure them it won’t negatively impact them?


The Becon Consortium plans to build a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant, an Energy from Waste (EfW) plant using an incinerator with energy recovery process and a Visitor Centre at the Hightown Quarry site on the Boghill Road, Mallusk. This will enable arc21, the umbrella waste body for 6 Councils in the East of Northern Ireland, meet European landfill diversion targets and manage its waste more sustainably.

This project represents a major investment for Northern Ireland – approximately £240 million in development and construction alone. In the construction of the new waste facilities, local contractors will be used wherever possible, thereby maximising opportunities for employment and benefiting the wider local economy. An independent economic assessment estimates it will support 337 permanent direct and indirect jobs when the plants are operational.

arc21 is the umbrella waste management group for 6 councils in the east of Northern Ireland and is the procuring authority for this project. The proposed infrastructure will complement existing recycling and composting facilities in Northern Ireland which process material collected by the arc21 councils.

At present, arc21’s region accounts for 55% of all Northern Ireland’s municipal waste – 508,426 tonnes for the year to March 2015. Household recycling rates have jumped to over 41.5% from just 7.5% in 2000. arc21’s aim is to continue to improve recycling rates.

The technology proposed is part of the overarching solution to radically improve waste management in the arc21 area and is identified as part of the preferred mix of treatment solutions set out in the arc21 Waste Management Plan.

The development of these facilities is subject to the completion of the ongoing arc21 procurement process, securing planning permission and the attainment of various regulatory permits.

The Becon Consortium was formed to pursue the opportunity created by arc21’s public procurement for its residual waste treatment project. The location and design of the proposals developed by the Becon Consortium in respect of the project and key milestones are set out on this website.

The company behind the Becon Consortium is Indaver (NI) Ltd (previously known as EEW Energy from Waste UK Limited). During the latter part of 2015 and the early part of 2016, Indaver (NI) Ltd was acquired from EEW Energy from Waste GmBH by Indaver N.V.

Indaver N.V. has for over 25 years been providing integrated waste management services to public authorities. These partnerships deliver services which include: the treatment of municipal waste; the organisation of waste management systems and the development and management of specialised waste treatment facilities.

In 2011 Indaver completed the construction of the first municipal Energy from Waste plant on the island of Ireland. The plant located at Duleek, Co. Meath provides a thermal treatment and recovery solution for 230,000 tonnes of household and commercial waste annually while generating renewable electricity to power 20,000 homes. Each year, across 6 European countries, Indaver manages more than 5 million tonnes of waste, the majority of which is either recovered as energy or recycled.

For further details visit www.indaver.com

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020 under the EU Landfill Directive. If we don’t meet these targets we could face heavy financial penalties for non-compliance.

Locating the facilities in the arc21 area is entirely consistent with the proximity and self-sufficiency principles outlined in European Waste Management Law. The proximity principle advocates that waste should be disposed of (or otherwise managed) close to the point at which it is generated, thus aiming to achieve responsible self-sufficiency within a region. The Becon project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

The proposed facilities will help the 6 Councils to not only meet their EU landfill reduction targets, therefore avoiding potential fines, but will also help increase overall recycling levels within the arc21 area by up to 10%. The project will also export 14MW electricity to the National Grid, enough to power more than 30,000 homes, contributing to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets, while significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to using landfill.

We must reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and become more self-sufficient in terms of energy generation. This is crucial if we are to prosper economically, attract new investment and create jobs for future generations. This project will also contribute to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy target and greenhouse gas reduction targets.

The plants will help Northern Ireland to meet its landfill reduction targets and recycling targets, as well as contributing to our greenhouse gas reduction targets and renewable energy targets through producing sustainable energy.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020. This project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

At the same time, recycling will continue to be a major focus with an NI target of 60% for household recycling by 2020 currently under consideration. This project will increase arc21’s constituent Councils’ overall recycling rates by up to 10% through the extraction of plastics, metals, aggregates and other valuable materials.

We also have targets to produce a minimum of 40% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% based on 1990 levels by 2025. Using all our waste efficiently and effectively and treating it as a valuable resource will help meet these targets. The Becon Project will contribute over 50,000 MWh per year to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets and reduce C0₂ Equivalent greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 tonnes per year relative to sending waste to landfill.

A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant is a type of waste processing facility that combines an automated mechanical pre-sorting facility and a form of biological treatment.

The mechanical treatment component of the plant typically resembles a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and separates different materials to allow for efficient management of the waste. The biological treatment can include composting, bio-drying or anaerobic digestion. The type of waste treatment being proposed in the MBT plant is widely used in Great Britain and Europe. A recent study on MBT plants in Europe suggests that there are more than 330 plants currently in operation with a capacity to treat up to 33 million tonnes annually.

Energy from Waste (EfW) technology involves the thermal treatment of waste to release energy that is then used to generate steam and electricity. Thermal waste treatment is a tried and tested technology that ensures the safe and environmentally responsible treatment of waste. EfW plants have operated throughout continental Europe for decades, with over 450 plants in operation today. Many of these are located in countries with long established ‘green’ credentials such as the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany alone, some 24 million tonnes of waste a year are processed in EfW plants. In Great Britain, there are currently 36 EfW plants consented or in operation.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process and will incorporate the latest emissions technologies used successfully across Continental Europe. Employing EfW technology is compatible with high levels of recycling, evident in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. These countries use EfW extensively yet have combined recycling and composting rates of over 50%.

In heat energy terms the EfW has an annual capacity of 68MWTHERMAL. The facility will be able to export approximately 14MWELECTRIC of electricity to the grid, which will provide over 100,000 MWh per year, enough electricity to power over 30,000 homes.

The heat produced in the EfW will be used primarily to generate electricity but will also be used to supply a number of heat requirements on the site such as the MBT biological treatment and other onsite facilities. Up to 10MWTH of heat, in addition to electricity export, could be available for potential heat off-take which can be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

There are a number of benefits in co-locating the two facilities on the same site in Hightown Quarry, Mallusk:

Up to 90% of the waste delivered to the site is expected to be municipal residual waste (black bin waste) from the 6 arc21 councils. The remaining waste, which will be used to fill the EfW to capacity to maximise efficiency and electricity generation, will be commercial and industrial waste sourced from a third party.

The site has been designed to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste in any given year, which will be split between the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility (capacity 300,000 tonnes) and the Energy from Waste (EfW) facility (capacity 68MWTH). For the year 2019/20, based on the assumed waste composition and projected waste tonnages the MBT is expected to accept and treat 241,319 tonnes of arc21 Municipal Waste and the EfW is expected to thermally treat 211,000 tonnes of fuel generated in the MBT and Third Party Waste.

Yes, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing the region’s waste. The Becon Consortium will work with arc21 to encourage people to minimise waste and to increase reuse and recycling. However, not all waste can be dealt with in this way and the proposed facilities are urgently needed to reduce the amount of residual waste – the waste that cannot be recycled – being sent to landfill.

The proposed MBT will have the capacity to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste, however it is likely to treat approximately 245,000 tonnes per year. Materials such as metals, plastics and other recyclable products will be extracted from the waste at the mechanical treatment stage using automated separation equipment and manual hand picking. The organic rich material of the waste remaining after recyclate extraction will be treated in the Bio-drying Tunnels to reduce its mass and improve the combustion characteristics of the material. Following the MBT process, any material which cannot be recycled will be conveyed to the EfW plant as a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) for recovery. All stages of the MBT operations are undertaken in purpose-designed, fully enclosed buildings, thus preventing noise, dust and smells from escaping.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process with a thermal capacity of 68MWTH and is expected to accept and treat approximately 211,000 tonnes of waste per annum. The Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) generated in the MBT will be conveyed directly to the EfW bunker where it will be mixed with commercial and industrial waste to produce a fuel. The heat produced from the combustion of the fuel will be used primarily to generate electricity of which approximately 14MW will be exported to the grid.

In addition to electricity export, up to 10MW of the heat produced in the EfW may also be used to supply potential ‘heat off-take’, which could be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

The site will be operational 24 hours per day seven days a week however the majority of arc21 waste is expected to be delivered from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm Saturdays. On occasion it will be necessary to deliver waste to the site outside of these hours when requested by the Authority, and this will be by prior arrangement. All Third Party Waste deliveries will run concurrently with Authority Waste deliveries.

Yes. The ash generated in the EfW incineration process will be processed on site to produce a material which can be used as an aggregate in the construction industry.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Mallusk
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

The Consortium was free to choose a suitable site anywhere in the arc21 region, either from a list of available sites provided by arc21 or using its own alternative.

Following a comprehensive site selection process the Hightown quarry site, Mallusk was chosen because:

The technology is proven, reliable and strictly regulated. To be allowed to operate, the EfW facility will require an Environmental Permit which is only issued if the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) is satisfied that people and the environment are protected.

Once operational the proposed plants will be regulated by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and will comply with the strict emission limits set under the Environmental Permit and the Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU). The emissions from the EfW will be constantly monitored to ensure that the plant always operates within the limits set out in the Environmental Permit.

One of the permit requirements will be that there is no noticeable odour and frequent checks will be carried out to ensure this is strictly enforced. A number of measures will be employed to ensure that odours are contained within the facilities, including ventilation, negative air pressure and bio-filter systems. All waste will be handled inside fully contained buildings and all vehicles bringing waste to site will be covered to prevent odours escaping.

The design of the facility will minimise noise impacts and any equipment with the potential to be noisy will be located within acoustically insulated buildings.

A noise impact assessment has been undertaken as part of the Environmental Statement and demonstrates that the site will operate to satisfactory levels. The removal of blasting, crushing and quarrying activity will improve the baseline noise levels

No. The proposed plant will not emit smoke, with any visible plume being colourless steam which will be invisible, except in very cold and dry weather conditions when some condensation vapour may be visible. All emissions from the facility will be tightly controlled and monitored 24 hours a day, and will go through a state of the art cleaning process to ensure there is no unacceptable impact on the environment or air quality. A detailed Air Quality Impact Assessment is being submitted as part of the planning application which will outline all air quality considerations.

The average coal-fired power station will annually emit over 100 times more sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides than a typical EfW plant. Compared to coal or oil-fired power stations, EfWs emit less fossil CO₂. EfW facilities actually help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting waste away from landfill, and have a significantly more positive effect on climate protection.

Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities are among the most tightly regulated industrial processes. Dioxins are a family of chemicals which are present in the environment and are a natural by-product of any combustion process. A modern EfW facility will take 100 years of constant operation to produce more dioxins than that emitted during 15 minutes worth of fireworks in London to celebrate the millennium.

In addition to the Environmental Impact Assessment set to protect the environment and health, a voluntary Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been commissioned to draw from and build upon the regulatory assessment to further investigate and address local community concerns. The scope and focus of the HIA has been discussed with the Public Health Agency and Environmental Health Officers, and will be further refined through the issues and opportunities raised by local communities through the comprehensive consultation exercise.

The final HIA will apply the current scientific evidence base to test the UK Health Protection Agency’s position, that modern, well run facilities present a negligible impact on local air quality and no measurable risk to health.

Much of the traffic that will be going to the site is currently already in the local area going to landfill.
Subject to final approval, vehicles are expected to travel to the facility between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. Vehicles travelling to the facility will be fully covered and cleaned regularly. There is a wheel wash system located next to the exit which will be used by all outgoing vehicles.

Detailed traffic studies and planning has indicated that on average there will be a total of 224 vehicles arriving and 224 vehicles departing the site per day. The vehicle mix is made up of 143 HGV movements and 81 car movements.
The average vehicle flow will total 20 vehicles arriving (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) and 20 vehicles departing (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) when the site is operational.

The average daily numbers of HGV vehicle movements to the site over the ten year period of quarrying activity between 1999 and 2008 was 89 one-way (in-bound) trips. The net change in the number of HGV daily trips anticipated with the proposed development is extremely modest with some 118 HGVs anticipated on a daily basis.

Our Traffic Assessment shows that operational traffic (HGV and cars) for the proposed Becon site is largely concentrated on accessing and using the motorway network and will involve the diversion of much of the waste traffic currently making its way to Cottonmount Landfill (where nine of the 11 Councils residual waste is currently going) to the Hightown Quarry site.
It is anticipated that over 82% of site vehicles (HGVs and cars) will access the site from the Sandyknowles/ M2 junction with over 67% originating from the M2 itself. On entering the Mallusk area we are proposing that this traffic will turn left towards the Hightown Road and then turn right onto the Hightown Road. At the top of the Hightown Road it will turn right onto HydePark Road and then immediate left on the Boghill Road, where it will make its way to the site.
It is anticipated that around 17.5 % of the vehicles will continue to use the Mallusk Road and then follow the same route above to access the Boghill Road site entrance.

Historically, quarry operations at Hightown have at times also generated substantially more HGV traffic than the proposed development. Given the unrestricted nature of the quarry planning permission, the potential to generate high volumes of quarry traffic at any time of the day still remains and with little prospect of road improvements or controls in place.
With this project however, a number of important road improvements will me made and controls put in place to ensure the timing of waste deliveries will be restricted to between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. The routes used will also be clearly agreed and communicated with the drivers of all vehicles accessing and exiting the Hightown site. These routes will be tightly monitored and controlled, with route direction signs located at appropriate points to direct vehicles onto the specified routes to be used. Where persistent breaches of Becon’s instructions are recorded the offending drivers will receive a verbal warning and if the breaches continue the driver will be suspended from accessing the site and where appropriate the driver’s employer will be advised of the suspension.

Significant infrastructural improvements will include widening of the Boghill Road along a 1.2km stretch from the junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Rd to the access road to the site. The road will be widened to a 6.7m carriageway with a 2m footpath on its northern side – a substantial improvement from its current condition, which at its narrowest is only 4m wide. The junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Road will also be enhanced to improve sightlines.

This will depend on exactly where you live, but the appearance of the proposed plants will be an important factor in their design to minimise impact on the local area. A detailed Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment has been prepared as part of the Environmental Statement and is available to view on the website in the Downloads section.

The EfW will be housed in a purpose-designed modern, streamlined building. The intention of the design is to use the tiered quarry platforms of the site to minimise the visual impact of the development. The topography of the quarry site means that many of the buildings on the site will not be visible from various locations. The new enclosed facilities will be in keeping with the surrounding area and a landscaping and planting programme will be undertaken to minimise visual impact further and to increase the diversity of local wildlife habitats.

The higher EfW building and flue will be seen in longer views although rendered photomontages demonstrate that this impact will be relatively modest. The proposed EfW facility will include a stack which will be 80 metres in height. The height of the stack is determined by the need to be elevated above the quarry face for dispersal of steam emissions.

MBT building – 14 m
EFW building – 52 m
EFW Stack – 80 m

The project is subject to receiving planning permission. The planning application was submitted in March 2014 and a notice of opinion was issued by the then Minister Of the Environment, Mark H Durkan to refuse planning in September 2015. His notice of opinion was contrary to that of his Departmental officials who recommended a notice to approve. The application has now been referred to the Planning Appeals Commission for an appeal hearing scheduled for October 2016. Ultimately it will be the Minister for the Department of Infrastructure who will determine planning.

The project is subject to planning permission, so it is difficult to say at this stage when construction will commence. What we can say is that from receipt of planning permission we would aim to have the site constructed and in full operation within four years.

The scale of the project marks it out as one of regional significance and as such its planning will be managed by the Department of the Environment (DoE) Planning’s ‘Strategic Projects’ team. Major projects are known as ‘Article 31’ projects as they trigger that part of the Planning Order. The Department identifies those applications that are to be treated as major and its decision on an Article 31 application is final.

Having considered the application, including representations from the public, the Departmental Minister serves a notice on the applicant indicating the decision which it proposes to make (referred to as a Notice of Opinion). This can be a Notice of Opinion to Approve or Refuse. In this instance the then Minister issued a Notice of Opinion to refuse in September 2015 (which was contrary to the recommendation of his departmental officials)

The applicant has subsequently requested an Appeal Hearing in front of the Planning Appeals Commission (PAC). The PAC is an independent body which, at the request of the DoE conducts Inquiries or Hearings to consider major planning applications.

The Hearing will be held in October 2016 with a report then being forward to the Department and a final decision by the Minister for Infrastructure.

Before a planning application is submitted, the Becon Consortium intends to carry out an extensive pre-application consultation programme on the proposals. This will include:

Feedback facilities for the local community will be made available via newsletters and Drop In exhibition events to allow people to provide their comments on the proposals. There will also be an online feedback facility on the website. We are keen to hear your views and feedback as these will inform our final planning application.

Later in the process, the consortium will hold an Open Day for local businesses so they can meet the Project Team and discuss potential opportunities for working on the development.

The total investment in these facilities will be £240 million.

Over the 41 month construction phase it is estimated that 2,701 direct job years of employment will be created or sustained of which 2,220 job years will directly relate to construction activities. At the peak of the construction activities it is estimated that upwards of 455 construction workers will be engaged on the site.

Once fully operational it is estimated that 94 full time permanent jobs will be created at the new waste processing facilities at the Hightown Quarry site. An additional 243 indirect and / or induced jobs will also be created or sustained in the wider Northern Ireland economy as a result of the on-going operations at the Hightown Quarry site.

This project delivers a necessary solution for waste management within the overall arc21 area which will divert residual waste (the remaining waste which can’t be recycled or reused) from landfill. This will help NI achieve its environmental obligations on waste management and in the process help avoid landfill tax and potential fines from EU for failing to meet our targets.

This project will also bring investment into Northern Ireland at a time when it is much needed. The local area will benefit from 455 construction jobs at the peak of the on-site construction activities and create/sustain approximately 340 direct and indirect jobs annually during operation. Wherever possible the suppliers and sub-contractors under consideration for contract awards will be drawn from the locality of the Hightown Quarry site in the first instance and Northern Ireland in general in accordance with the Project’s commitment to equality and sustainable development. There will also be opportunities for young people from the local area to take part in apprentice training schemes.

The Consortium aims to source substantial quantities of construction materials such as concrete, steel and metal cladding from local suppliers. 25% of the materials required for the EfW plant will be sourced locally, and 50% of the materials required for the construction of the MBT plant.

The Consortium proposes to deliver a long-term sustainable solution designed to maximise the value from waste and the intent is that the Project will therefore become an integral part of the local community. The Consortium will be fully committed to playing its part in supporting the local community.
As an example of this, the facilities will include a state of the art Visitor Centre which will not only be made available to the local community but which will add to the local tourist/visitor offering, attracting an estimated 3,000 visitors per annum. It will also act as a useful resource for local schools and colleges to support their learning programme.

House prices are influenced by a wide variety of factors, the most important of those over recent times being a depressed economic climate.
While we fully appreciate that some people may have concerns about the potential impact of our project on house prices in the area, our experience tells us that these fears are often based on a lack of knowledge and understanding about the tried and tested technology that we are proposing. With over 20 years’ experience of delivering and operating 19 similar facilities across Europe we are not aware of any evidence that the development or presence of well managed waste facilities such as those we are proposing has any measurable or lasting impact on house prices or the saleability of homes in nearby areas. In fact some evidence suggests that in many cases their presence gives a benefit to the local community in terms of local investment and jobs and providing affordable district heating systems and electricity.
Our experience also tells us however that where there is a lack of understanding about these types of facilities that it is vitally important to share as much information with people to allow them to become more familiar with the proposals and the technologies, therefore addressing their concerns.
There have been a number of independent studies carried out across the UK and Ireland which have assessed the potential impact of similar facilities on house prices, and which draw on European experience. You may find them useful if you have any concerns about the potential impact on property prices in the area.
One UK study suggests that energy from waste plants/incinerators do not lead to decreased property values. Research in Hampshire, before and after the construction of three incinerators in the last seven years, found that there was “no noticeable or lasting adverse effect on the property markets in those locations due to the presence of the incinerators”. You can find the report here

In all three locations values have continued to rise in line with other areas in their local markets. In addition there has been substantial investment/development in both the residential and commercial sectors in the areas around the plants in the periods following grant of planning consent and construction. This has continued once the plants have become operational”. Cluttons Surveyors

Independent research was also carried out into the potential impact of the Poolbeg Thermal Treatment Plant in Dublin on local property values. This study also focused on available evidence elsewhere across Europe where these facilities exist in many urban area near local housing.
The research carried out indicated that ‘there appears to be have been no impact on house prices or the volume of properties being offered for sale in the vicinity of Poolbeg since it was announced in 2001.’ The full report can be found at http://www.dublinwastetoenergy.ie/uploads/archive/files/briefs-of-evidence/marie-hunt.pdf

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The technology is proven, reliable and strictly regulated. To be allowed to operate, the EfW facility will require an Environmental Permit which is only issued if the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) is satisfied that people and the environment are protected.

Once operational the proposed plants will be regulated by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and will comply with the strict emission limits set under the Environmental Permit and the Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU). The emissions from the EfW will be constantly monitored to ensure that the plant always operates within the limits set out in the Environmental Permit.

The total investment in these facilities will be £240 million.

The Becon Consortium plans to build a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant, an Energy from Waste (EfW) plant and a Visitor Centre at the Hightown Quarry site on the Boghill Road, Mallusk. This will enable arc21, the umbrella waste body for 11 Councils in the East of Northern Ireland, meet European landfill diversion targets and manage its waste more sustainably.

This project represents a major investment for Northern Ireland – approximately £240 million in development and construction alone. In the construction of the new waste facilities, local contractors will be used wherever possible, thereby maximising opportunities for employment and benefiting the wider local economy. An independent economic assessment estimates it will support 337 permanent direct and indirect jobs when the plants are operational.

The project is subject to receiving planning permission and we are currently involved in the PAD process which encourages submission of draft planning application documentation for review by DoE Strategic Projects team and its consultees. We hope to submit the formal planning application by autumn 2013. We will continue to engage with DoE and its consultees to try and secure a planning decision as soon as possible.

The project is subject to receiving planning permission. The planning application was submitted in March 2014 and a notice of opinion was issued by the then Minister Of the Environment, Mark H Durkan to refuse planning in September 2015. His notice of opinion was contrary to that of his Departmental officials who recommended a notice to approve. The application has now been referred to the Planning Appeals Commission for an appeal hearing scheduled for October 2016. Ultimately it will be the Minister for the Department of Infrastructure who will determine planning.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Mallusk
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The technology is proven, reliable and strictly regulated. To be allowed to operate, the EfW facility will require an Environmental Permit which is only issued if the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) is satisfied that people and the environment are protected.

Once operational the proposed plants will be regulated by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and will comply with the strict emission limits set under the Environmental Permit and the Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU). The emissions from the EfW will be constantly monitored to ensure that the plant always operates within the limits set out in the Environmental Permit.

The total investment in these facilities will be £240 million.

The Becon Consortium plans to build a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant, an Energy from Waste (EfW) plant using an incinerator with energy recovery process and a Visitor Centre at the Hightown Quarry site on the Boghill Road, Mallusk. This will enable arc21, the umbrella waste body for 6 Councils in the East of Northern Ireland, meet European landfill diversion targets and manage its waste more sustainably.

This project represents a major investment for Northern Ireland – approximately £240 million in development and construction alone. In the construction of the new waste facilities, local contractors will be used wherever possible, thereby maximising opportunities for employment and benefiting the wider local economy. An independent economic assessment estimates it will support 337 permanent direct and indirect jobs when the plants are operational.

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Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

One of the permit requirements will be that there is no noticeable odour and frequent checks will be carried out to ensure this is strictly enforced. A number of measures will be employed to ensure that odours are contained within the facilities, including ventilation, negative air pressure and bio-filter systems. All waste will be handled inside fully contained buildings and all vehicles bringing waste to site will be covered to prevent odours escaping.

Over the 41 month construction phase it is estimated that 2,701 direct job years of employment will be created or sustained of which 2,220 job years will directly relate to construction activities. At the peak of the construction activities it is estimated that upwards of 455 construction workers will be engaged on the site.

Once fully operational it is estimated that 94 full time permanent jobs will be created at the new waste processing facilities at the Hightown Quarry site. An additional 243 indirect and / or induced jobs will also be created or sustained in the wider Northern Ireland economy as a result of the on-going operations at the Hightown Quarry site.

arc21 is the umbrella waste management group for 11 councils in the east of Northern Ireland and is the procuring authority for this project. The proposed infrastructure will complement existing recycling and composting facilities in Northern Ireland which process material collected by the arc21 councils.

At present, arc21’s region accounts for 54% of all Northern Ireland’s municipal waste – 518,000 tonnes for the year to March 2012. Household recycling rates have jumped to over 39% from just 7.5% in 2000. arc21’s aim is to continue to improve recycling rates.

The technology proposed is part of the overarching solution to radically improve waste management in the arc21 area and is identified as part of the preferred mix of treatment solutions set out in the arc21 Waste Management Plan.

The development of these facilities is subject to the completion of the ongoing arc21 procurement process, securing planning permission and the attainment of various regulatory permits.

The project is subject to planning permission, so it is difficult to say at this stage when construction will commence. What we can say is that from receipt of planning permission we would aim to have the site constructed and in full operation within four years.

Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

The project is subject to planning permission, so it is difficult to say at this stage when construction will commence. What we can say is that from receipt of planning permission we would aim to have the site constructed and in full operation within four years.

arc21 is the umbrella waste management group for 6 councils in the east of Northern Ireland and is the procuring authority for this project. The proposed infrastructure will complement existing recycling and composting facilities in Northern Ireland which process material collected by the arc21 councils.

At present, arc21’s region accounts for 55% of all Northern Ireland’s municipal waste – 508,426 tonnes for the year to March 2015. Household recycling rates have jumped to over 41.5% from just 7.5% in 2000. arc21’s aim is to continue to improve recycling rates.

The technology proposed is part of the overarching solution to radically improve waste management in the arc21 area and is identified as part of the preferred mix of treatment solutions set out in the arc21 Waste Management Plan.

The development of these facilities is subject to the completion of the ongoing arc21 procurement process, securing planning permission and the attainment of various regulatory permits.

One of the permit requirements will be that there is no noticeable odour and frequent checks will be carried out to ensure this is strictly enforced. A number of measures will be employed to ensure that odours are contained within the facilities, including ventilation, negative air pressure and bio-filter systems. All waste will be handled inside fully contained buildings and all vehicles bringing waste to site will be covered to prevent odours escaping.

Over the 41 month construction phase it is estimated that 2,701 direct job years of employment will be created or sustained of which 2,220 job years will directly relate to construction activities. At the peak of the construction activities it is estimated that upwards of 455 construction workers will be engaged on the site.

Once fully operational it is estimated that 94 full time permanent jobs will be created at the new waste processing facilities at the Hightown Quarry site. An additional 243 indirect and / or induced jobs will also be created or sustained in the wider Northern Ireland economy as a result of the on-going operations at the Hightown Quarry site.

The Consortium was free to choose a suitable site anywhere in the arc21 region, either from a list of available sites provided by arc21 or using its own alternative.

Following a comprehensive site selection process the Hightown quarry site was chosen because:

The design of the facility will minimise noise impacts and any equipment with the potential to be noisy will be located within acoustically insulated buildings.

A noise impact assessment has been undertaken as part of the Environmental Statement and demonstrates that the site will operate to satisfactory levels. The removal of blasting, crushing and quarrying activity will improve the baseline noise levels on the site.

The scale of the project marks it out as one of regional significance and as such its planning will be managed by the Department of the Environment (DoE) Planning’s ‘Strategic Projects’ team. Major projects are known as ‘Article 31’ projects as they trigger that part of the Planning Order. The Department identifies those applications that are to be treated as major and its decision on an Article 31 application is final.

Having considered the application, including representations from the public, the Department may decide to request the Planning Appeals Commission (PAC) to hold a local public inquiry. Alternatively, the Department may serve a notice on the applicant indicating the decision which it proposes to make (referred to as a Notice of Opinion). This can be a Notice of Opinion to Approve or Refuse. The applicant may request a hearing before the Commission within the period specified in the Notice of Opinion.

The PAC is an independent body which, at the request of the DoE conducts Inquiries or Hearings to consider major planning applications.

This project delivers a necessary solution for waste management within the overall arc21 area which will divert residual waste (the remaining waste which can’t be recycled or reused) from landfill. This will help NI achieve its environmental obligations on waste management and in the process help avoid landfill tax and potential fines from EU for failing to meet our targets.

This project will also bring investment into Northern Ireland at a time when it is much needed. The local area will benefit from 455 construction jobs at the peak of the on-site construction activities and create/sustain approximately 340 direct and indirect jobs annually during operation. Wherever possible the suppliers and sub-contractors under consideration for contract awards will be drawn from the locality of the Hightown Quarry site in the first instance and Northern Ireland in general in accordance with the Project’s commitment to equality and sustainable development. There will also be opportunities for young people from the local area to take part in apprentice training schemes.

The Consortium aims to source substantial quantities of construction materials such as concrete, steel and metal cladding from local suppliers. 25% of the materials required for the EfW plant will be sourced locally, and 50% of the materials required for the construction of the MBT plant.
The Consortium proposes to deliver a long-term sustainable solution designed to maximise the value from waste and the intent is that the Project will therefore become an integral part of the local community. The Consortium will be fully committed to playing its part in supporting the local community. As an example of this, the facilities will include a state of the art Visitor Centre which will not only be made available to the local community but which will add to the local tourist/visitor offering, attracting an estimated 3,000 visitors per annum. It will also act as a useful resource for local schools and colleges to support their learning programme.

The driving force behind the Becon Consortium is E.ON Energy from Waste (EEW) which develops, builds, finances and operates EfW plants throughout Europe and has a proven track record of integrity, reliability and environmental performance. The company is currently owned by the E.ON Group. However, agreement has been reached on the sale of EEW to a joint venture comprising the EQT Fund and E.ON SE. This is subject to final approval by the EU Antitrust Authority which is anticipated in the first half of 2013. EQT is a group of leading private equity funds with investments in Northern and Eastern Europe, Asia and the US. The group’s activities focus on infrastructure, growth financing and buyouts.

Directly, or through subsidiaries and associated companies, EEW currently owns and operates 19 EfW facilities, including plants in Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The company’s plants handle approximately five million tonnes of municipal and industrial waste each year and generate up to 2,900GWh of steam/heat and up to 2,800GWh of electricity.

For further details visit www.eon-energyfromwaste.com

The Consortium was free to choose a suitable site anywhere in the arc21 region, either from a list of available sites provided by arc21 or using its own alternative.

Following a comprehensive site selection process the Hightown quarry site, Mallusk was chosen because:

The scale of the project marks it out as one of regional significance and as such its planning will be managed by the Department of the Environment (DoE) Planning’s ‘Strategic Projects’ team. Major projects are known as ‘Article 31’ projects as they trigger that part of the Planning Order. The Department identifies those applications that are to be treated as major and its decision on an Article 31 application is final.

Having considered the application, including representations from the public, the Departmental Minister serves a notice on the applicant indicating the decision which it proposes to make (referred to as a Notice of Opinion). This can be a Notice of Opinion to Approve or Refuse. In this instance the then Minister issued a Notice of Opinion to refuse in September 2015 (which was contrary to the recommendation of his departmental officials)

The applicant has subsequently requested an Appeal Hearing in front of the Planning Appeals Commission (PAC). The PAC is an independent body which, at the request of the DoE conducts Inquiries or Hearings to consider major planning applications.

The Hearing will be held in October 2016 with a report then being forward to the Department and a final decision by the Minister for Infrastructure.

The Becon Consortium was formed to pursue the opportunity created by arc21’s public procurement for its residual waste treatment project. The location and design of the proposals developed by the Becon Consortium in respect of the project and key milestones are set out on this website.

The company behind the Becon Consortium is Indaver (NI) Ltd (previously known as EEW Energy from Waste UK Limited). During the latter part of 2015 and the early part of 2016, Indaver (NI) Ltd was acquired from EEW Energy from Waste GmBH by Indaver N.V.

Indaver N.V. has for over 25 years been providing integrated waste management services to public authorities. These partnerships deliver services which include: the treatment of municipal waste; the organisation of waste management systems and the development and management of specialised waste treatment facilities.

In 2011 Indaver completed the construction of the first municipal Energy from Waste plant on the island of Ireland. The plant located at Duleek, Co. Meath provides a thermal treatment and recovery solution for 230,000 tonnes of household and commercial waste annually while generating renewable electricity to power 20,000 homes. Each year, across 6 European countries, Indaver manages more than 5 million tonnes of waste, the majority of which is either recovered as energy or recycled.

For further details visit www.indaver.com

The design of the facility will minimise noise impacts and any equipment with the potential to be noisy will be located within acoustically insulated buildings.

A noise impact assessment has been undertaken as part of the Environmental Statement and demonstrates that the site will operate to satisfactory levels. The removal of blasting, crushing and quarrying activity will improve the baseline noise levels

This project delivers a necessary solution for waste management within the overall arc21 area which will divert residual waste (the remaining waste which can’t be recycled or reused) from landfill. This will help NI achieve its environmental obligations on waste management and in the process help avoid landfill tax and potential fines from EU for failing to meet our targets.

This project will also bring investment into Northern Ireland at a time when it is much needed. The local area will benefit from 455 construction jobs at the peak of the on-site construction activities and create/sustain approximately 340 direct and indirect jobs annually during operation. Wherever possible the suppliers and sub-contractors under consideration for contract awards will be drawn from the locality of the Hightown Quarry site in the first instance and Northern Ireland in general in accordance with the Project’s commitment to equality and sustainable development. There will also be opportunities for young people from the local area to take part in apprentice training schemes.

The Consortium aims to source substantial quantities of construction materials such as concrete, steel and metal cladding from local suppliers. 25% of the materials required for the EfW plant will be sourced locally, and 50% of the materials required for the construction of the MBT plant.

The Consortium proposes to deliver a long-term sustainable solution designed to maximise the value from waste and the intent is that the Project will therefore become an integral part of the local community. The Consortium will be fully committed to playing its part in supporting the local community.
As an example of this, the facilities will include a state of the art Visitor Centre which will not only be made available to the local community but which will add to the local tourist/visitor offering, attracting an estimated 3,000 visitors per annum. It will also act as a useful resource for local schools and colleges to support their learning programme.

No. The proposed plant will not emit smoke, with any visible plume being colourless steam which will be invisible, except in very cold and dry weather conditions when some condensation vapour may be visible. All emissions from the facility will be tightly controlled and monitored 24 hours a day, and will go through a state of the art cleaning process to ensure there is no unacceptable impact on the environment or air quality. A detailed Air Quality Impact Assessment is being submitted as part of the planning application which will outline all air quality considerations.

The average coal-fired power station will annually emit over 100 times more sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides than a typical EfW plant. Compared to coal or oil-fired power stations, EfWs emit less fossil CO₂. EfW facilities actually help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting waste away from landfill, and have a significantly more positive effect on climate protection.

Before a planning application is submitted, the Becon Consortium intends to carry out an extensive pre-application consultation programme on the proposals. This will include:

Feedback facilities for the local community will be made available via newsletters and Drop In exhibition events to allow people to provide their comments on the proposals. There will also be an online feedback facility on the website. We are keen to hear your views and feedback as these will inform our final planning application.

Later in the process, the consortium will hold an Open Day for local businesses so they can meet the Project Team and discuss potential opportunities for working on the development.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020 under the EU Landfill Directive. If we don’t meet these targets we could face heavy financial penalties for non-compliance.

Locating the facilities in the arc21 area is entirely consistent with the proximity and self-sufficiency principles outlined in European Waste Management Law. The proximity principle advocates that waste should be disposed of (or otherwise managed) close to the point at which it is generated, thus aiming to achieve responsible self-sufficiency within a region. The Becon project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

The proposed facilities will help the 11 Councils to not only meet their EU landfill reduction targets, therefore avoiding potential fines, but will also help increase overall recycling levels within the arc21 area by up to 10%. The project will also export 14MW electricity to the National Grid, enough to power more than 30,000 homes, contributing to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets, while significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to using landfill.

We must reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and become more self-sufficient in terms of energy generation. This is crucial if we are to prosper economically, attract new investment and create jobs for future generations. This project will also contribute to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy target and greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020 under the EU Landfill Directive. If we don’t meet these targets we could face heavy financial penalties for non-compliance.

Locating the facilities in the arc21 area is entirely consistent with the proximity and self-sufficiency principles outlined in European Waste Management Law. The proximity principle advocates that waste should be disposed of (or otherwise managed) close to the point at which it is generated, thus aiming to achieve responsible self-sufficiency within a region. The Becon project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

The proposed facilities will help the 6 Councils to not only meet their EU landfill reduction targets, therefore avoiding potential fines, but will also help increase overall recycling levels within the arc21 area by up to 10%. The project will also export 14MW electricity to the National Grid, enough to power more than 30,000 homes, contributing to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets, while significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to using landfill.

We must reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and become more self-sufficient in terms of energy generation. This is crucial if we are to prosper economically, attract new investment and create jobs for future generations. This project will also contribute to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy target and greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Before a planning application is submitted, the Becon Consortium intends to carry out an extensive pre-application consultation programme on the proposals. This will include:

Feedback facilities for the local community will be made available via newsletters and Drop In exhibition events to allow people to provide their comments on the proposals. There will also be an online feedback facility on the website. We are keen to hear your views and feedback as these will inform our final planning application.

Later in the process, the consortium will hold an Open Day for local businesses so they can meet the Project Team and discuss potential opportunities for working on the development.

No. The proposed plant will not emit smoke, with any visible plume being colourless steam which will be invisible, except in very cold and dry weather conditions when some condensation vapour may be visible. All emissions from the facility will be tightly controlled and monitored 24 hours a day, and will go through a state of the art cleaning process to ensure there is no unacceptable impact on the environment or air quality. A detailed Air Quality Impact Assessment is being submitted as part of the planning application which will outline all air quality considerations.

The average coal-fired power station will annually emit over 100 times more sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides than a typical EfW plant. Compared to coal or oil-fired power stations, EfWs emit less fossil CO₂. EfW facilities actually help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting waste away from landfill, and have a significantly more positive effect on climate protection.

Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities are among the most tightly regulated industrial processes. Dioxins are a family of chemicals which are present in the environment and are a natural by-product of any combustion process. A modern EfW facility will take 100 years of constant operation to produce more dioxins than that emitted during 15 minutes worth of fireworks in London to celebrate the millennium.

The plants will help Northern Ireland to meet its landfill reduction targets and recycling targets, as well as contributing to our greenhouse gas reduction targets and renewable energy targets through producing sustainable energy.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020. This project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

At the same time, recycling will continue to be a major focus with an NI target of 60% for household recycling by 2020 currently under consideration. This project will increase arc21’s constituent Councils’ overall recycling rates by up to 10% through the extraction of plastics, metals, aggregates and other valuable materials.

We also have targets to produce a minimum of 40% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% based on 1990 levels by 2025. Using all our waste efficiently and effectively and treating it as a valuable resource will help meet these targets.
The Becon Project will contribute over 50,000 MWh per year to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets and reduce C0₂ Equivalent greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 tonnes per year relative to sending waste to landfill.

The plants will help Northern Ireland to meet its landfill reduction targets and recycling targets, as well as contributing to our greenhouse gas reduction targets and renewable energy targets through producing sustainable energy.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020. This project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

At the same time, recycling will continue to be a major focus with an NI target of 60% for household recycling by 2020 currently under consideration. This project will increase arc21’s constituent Councils’ overall recycling rates by up to 10% through the extraction of plastics, metals, aggregates and other valuable materials.

We also have targets to produce a minimum of 40% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% based on 1990 levels by 2025. Using all our waste efficiently and effectively and treating it as a valuable resource will help meet these targets. The Becon Project will contribute over 50,000 MWh per year to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets and reduce C0₂ Equivalent greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 tonnes per year relative to sending waste to landfill.

House prices are influenced by a wide variety of factors, the most important of those over recent times being a depressed economic climate.
While we fully appreciate that some people may have concerns about the potential impact of our project on house prices in the area, our experience tells us that these fears are often based on a lack of knowledge and understanding about the tried and tested technology that we are proposing. With over 20 years’ experience of delivering and operating 19 similar facilities across Europe we are not aware of any evidence that the development or presence of well managed waste facilities such as those we are proposing has any measurable or lasting impact on house prices or the saleability of homes in nearby areas. In fact some evidence suggests that in many cases their presence gives a benefit to the local community in terms of local investment and jobs and providing affordable district heating systems and electricity.
Our experience also tells us however that where there is a lack of understanding about these types of facilities that it is vitally important to share as much information with people to allow them to become more familiar with the proposals and the technologies, therefore addressing their concerns.
There have been a number of independent studies carried out across the UK and Ireland which have assessed the potential impact of similar facilities on house prices, and which draw on European experience. You may find them useful if you have any concerns about the potential impact on property prices in the area.
One UK study suggests that energy from waste plants/incinerators do not lead to decreased property values. Research in Hampshire, before and after the construction of three incinerators in the last seven years, found that there was “no noticeable or lasting adverse effect on the property markets in those locations due to the presence of the incinerators”. You can find the report here

In all three locations values have continued to rise in line with other areas in their local markets. In addition there has been substantial investment/development in both the residential and commercial sectors in the areas around the plants in the periods following grant of planning consent and construction. This has continued once the plants have become operational”. Cluttons Surveyors

Independent research was also carried out into the potential impact of the Poolbeg Thermal Treatment Plant in Dublin on local property values. This study also focused on available evidence elsewhere across Europe where these facilities exist in many urban area near local housing.
The research carried out indicated that ‘there appears to be have been no impact on house prices or the volume of properties being offered for sale in the vicinity of Poolbeg since it was announced in 2001.’ The full report can be found at http://www.dublinwastetoenergy.ie/uploads/archive/files/briefs-of-evidence/marie-hunt.pdf

Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities are among the most tightly regulated industrial processes. Dioxins are a family of chemicals which are present in the environment and are a natural by-product of any combustion process. A modern EfW facility will take 100 years of constant operation to produce more dioxins than that emitted during 15 minutes worth of fireworks in London to celebrate the millennium.

In addition to the Environmental Impact Assessment set to protect the environment and health, a voluntary Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been commissioned to draw from and build upon the regulatory assessment to further investigate and address local community concerns. The scope and focus of the HIA has been discussed with the Public Health Agency and Environmental Health Officers, and will be further refined through the issues and opportunities raised by local communities through the comprehensive consultation exercise.

The final HIA will apply the current scientific evidence base to test the UK Health Protection Agency’s position, that modern, well run facilities present a negligible impact on local air quality and no measurable risk to health.

A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant is a type of waste processing facility that combines an automated mechanical pre-sorting facility and a form of biological treatment.

The mechanical treatment component of the plant typically resembles a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and separates different materials to allow for efficient management of the waste. The biological treatment can include composting, bio-drying or anaerobic digestion. The type of waste treatment being proposed in the MBT plant is widely used in Great Britain and Europe. A recent study on MBT plants in Europe suggests that there are more than 330 plants currently in operation with a capacity to treat up to 33 million tonnes annually.

A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant is a type of waste processing facility that combines an automated mechanical pre-sorting facility and a form of biological treatment.

The mechanical treatment component of the plant typically resembles a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and separates different materials to allow for efficient management of the waste. The biological treatment can include composting, bio-drying or anaerobic digestion. The type of waste treatment being proposed in the MBT plant is widely used in Great Britain and Europe. A recent study on MBT plants in Europe suggests that there are more than 330 plants currently in operation with a capacity to treat up to 33 million tonnes annually.

In addition to the Environmental Impact Assessment set to protect the environment and health, a voluntary Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been commissioned to draw from and build upon the regulatory assessment to further investigate and address local community concerns. The scope and focus of the HIA has been discussed with the Public Health Agency and Environmental Health Officers, and will be further refined through the issues and opportunities raised by local communities through the comprehensive consultation exercise.

The final HIA will apply the current scientific evidence base to test the UK Health Protection Agency’s position, that modern, well run facilities present a negligible impact on local air quality and no measurable risk to health.

Much of the traffic that will be going to the site is currently already in the local area going to landfill.
Subject to final approval, vehicles are expected to travel to the facility between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. Vehicles travelling to the facility will be fully covered and cleaned regularly. There is a wheel wash system located next to the exit which will be used by all outgoing vehicles.

Detailed traffic studies and planning has indicated that on average there will be a total of 199 vehicles arriving and 199 vehicles departing the site per day. The vehicle mix is made up of 118 HGV movements and 81 car movements.
The average flow will total 11 vehicles arriving (7 HGV trips & 4 car trips) and 11 vehicles departing (7 HGV trips & 4 car trips) per hour when the site is operational.

Energy from Waste (EfW) technology involves the thermal treatment of waste to release energy that is then used to generate steam and electricity. Thermal waste treatment is a tried and tested technology that ensures the safe and environmentally responsible treatment of waste. EfW plants have operated throughout continental Europe for decades, with over 450 plants in operation today. Many of these are located in countries with long established ‘green’ credentials such as the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany alone, some 24 million tonnes of waste a year are processed in EfW plants. In Great Britain, there are currently 36 EfW plants consented or in operation.

The proposed EfW plant will incorporate the latest emissions technologies used successfully across Continental Europe. Employing EfW technology is compatible with high levels of recycling, evident in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. These countries use EfW extensively yet have combined recycling and composting rates of over 50%.

Energy from Waste (EfW) technology involves the thermal treatment of waste to release energy that is then used to generate steam and electricity. Thermal waste treatment is a tried and tested technology that ensures the safe and environmentally responsible treatment of waste. EfW plants have operated throughout continental Europe for decades, with over 450 plants in operation today. Many of these are located in countries with long established ‘green’ credentials such as the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany alone, some 24 million tonnes of waste a year are processed in EfW plants. In Great Britain, there are currently 36 EfW plants consented or in operation.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process and will incorporate the latest emissions technologies used successfully across Continental Europe. Employing EfW technology is compatible with high levels of recycling, evident in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. These countries use EfW extensively yet have combined recycling and composting rates of over 50%.

Much of the traffic that will be going to the site is currently already in the local area going to landfill.
Subject to final approval, vehicles are expected to travel to the facility between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. Vehicles travelling to the facility will be fully covered and cleaned regularly. There is a wheel wash system located next to the exit which will be used by all outgoing vehicles.

Detailed traffic studies and planning has indicated that on average there will be a total of 224 vehicles arriving and 224 vehicles departing the site per day. The vehicle mix is made up of 143 HGV movements and 81 car movements.
The average vehicle flow will total 20 vehicles arriving (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) and 20 vehicles departing (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) when the site is operational.

The average daily numbers of HGV vehicle movements to the site over the ten year period of quarrying activity between 1999 and 2008 was 89 one-way (in-bound) trips. The net change in the number of HGV daily trips anticipated with the proposed development is extremely modest with some 118 HGVs anticipated on a daily basis.

In heat energy terms the EfW has an annual capacity of 68MWTHERMAL. The facility will be able to export approximately 14MWELECTRIC of electricity to the grid, which will provide over 100,000 MWh per year, enough electricity to power over 30,000 homes.

The heat produced in the EfW will be used primarily to generate electricity but will also be used to supply a number of heat requirements on the site such as the MBT biological treatment and other onsite facilities. Up to 10MWTH of heat, in addition to electricity export, could be available for potential heat off-take which can be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

In heat energy terms the EfW has an annual capacity of 68MWTHERMAL. The facility will be able to export approximately 14MWELECTRIC of electricity to the grid, which will provide over 100,000 MWh per year, enough electricity to power over 30,000 homes.

The heat produced in the EfW will be used primarily to generate electricity but will also be used to supply a number of heat requirements on the site such as the MBT biological treatment and other onsite facilities. Up to 10MWTH of heat, in addition to electricity export, could be available for potential heat off-take which can be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

The average daily numbers of HGV vehicle movements to the site over the ten year period of quarrying activity between 1999 and 2008 was 89 one-way (in-bound) trips. The net change in the number of HGV daily trips anticipated with the proposed development is extremely modest with some 118 HGVs anticipated on a daily basis.

Significant infrastructural improvements will include widening of the Boghill Road along a 1.2km stretch from the junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Rd to the access road to the site. The road will be widened to a 6.7m carriageway with a 2m footpath on its northern side – a substantial improvement from its current condition, which at its narrowest is only 4m wide. The junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Road will also be enhanced to improve sightlines.

There are a number of benefits in co-locating the two facilities on the same site:


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There are a number of benefits in co-locating the two facilities on the same site in Hightown Quarry, Mallusk:

Our Traffic Assessment shows that operational traffic (HGV and cars) for the proposed Becon site is largely concentrated on accessing and using the motorway network and will involve the diversion of much of the waste traffic currently making its way to Cottonmount Landfill (where nine of the 11 Councils residual waste is currently going) to the Hightown Quarry site.
It is anticipated that over 82% of site vehicles (HGVs and cars) will access the site from the Sandyknowles/ M2 junction with over 67% originating from the M2 itself. On entering the Mallusk area we are proposing that this traffic will turn left towards the Hightown Road and then turn right onto the Hightown Road. At the top of the Hightown Road it will turn right onto HydePark Road and then immediate left on the Boghill Road, where it will make its way to the site.
It is anticipated that around 17.5 % of the vehicles will continue to use the Mallusk Road and then follow the same route above to access the Boghill Road site entrance.

This will depend on exactly where you live, but the appearance of the proposed plants will be an important factor in their design to minimise impact on the local area. A detailed Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment has been prepared as part of the Environmental Statement and is available to view on the website in the Downloads section.

The EfW will be housed in a purpose-designed modern, streamlined building. The intention of the design is to use the tiered quarry platforms of the site to minimise the visual impact of the development. The topography of the quarry site means that many of the buildings on the site will not be visible from various locations. The new enclosed facilities will be in keeping with the surrounding area and a landscaping and planting programme will be undertaken to minimise visual impact further and to increase the diversity of local wildlife habitats.

The higher EfW building and flue will be seen in longer views although rendered photomontages demonstrate that this impact will be relatively modest. The proposed EfW facility will include a stack which will be 80 metres in height. The height of the stack is determined by the need to be elevated above the quarry face for dispersal of steam emissions.

Up to 90% of the waste delivered to the site is expected to be municipal residual waste (black bin waste) from the 11 arc21 councils. The remaining waste, which will be used to fill the EfW to capacity to maximise efficiency and electricity generation, will be commercial and industrial waste sourced from a third party.

Up to 90% of the waste delivered to the site is expected to be municipal residual waste (black bin waste) from the 6 arc21 councils. The remaining waste, which will be used to fill the EfW to capacity to maximise efficiency and electricity generation, will be commercial and industrial waste sourced from a third party.

Historically, quarry operations at Hightown have at times also generated substantially more HGV traffic than the proposed development. Given the unrestricted nature of the quarry planning permission, the potential to generate high volumes of quarry traffic at any time of the day still remains and with little prospect of road improvements or controls in place.
With this project however, a number of important road improvements will me made and controls put in place to ensure the timing of waste deliveries will be restricted to between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. The routes used will also be clearly agreed and communicated with the drivers of all vehicles accessing and exiting the Hightown site. These routes will be tightly monitored and controlled, with route direction signs located at appropriate points to direct vehicles onto the specified routes to be used. Where persistent breaches of Becon’s instructions are recorded the offending drivers will receive a verbal warning and if the breaches continue the driver will be suspended from accessing the site and where appropriate the driver’s employer will be advised of the suspension.

MBT building – 14 m
EFW building – 52 m
EFW Stack – 80 m

The site has been designed to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste in any given year, which will be split between the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility (capacity 300,000 tonnes) and the Energy from Waste (EfW) facility (capacity 68MWTH). For the year 2019/20, based on the assumed waste composition and projected waste tonnages the MBT is expected to accept and treat 241,319 tonnes of arc21 Municipal Waste and the EfW is expected to thermally treat 211,000 tonnes of fuel generated in the MBT and Third Party Waste.

The site has been designed to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste in any given year, which will be split between the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility (capacity 300,000 tonnes) and the Energy from Waste (EfW) facility (capacity 68MWTH). For the year 2019/20, based on the assumed waste composition and projected waste tonnages the MBT is expected to accept and treat 241,319 tonnes of arc21 Municipal Waste and the EfW is expected to thermally treat 211,000 tonnes of fuel generated in the MBT and Third Party Waste.

Significant infrastructural improvements will include widening of the Boghill Road along a 1.2km stretch from the junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Rd to the access road to the site. The road will be widened to a 6.7m carriageway with a 2m footpath on its northern side – a substantial improvement from its current condition, which at its narrowest is only 4m wide. The junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Road will also be enhanced to improve sightlines.

Yes, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing the region’s waste. The Becon Consortium will work with arc21 to encourage people to minimise waste and to increase reuse and recycling. However, not all waste can be dealt with in this way and the proposed facilities are urgently needed to reduce the amount of residual waste – the waste that cannot be recycled – being sent to landfill.

Yes, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing the region’s waste. The Becon Consortium will work with arc21 to encourage people to minimise waste and to increase reuse and recycling. However, not all waste can be dealt with in this way and the proposed facilities are urgently needed to reduce the amount of residual waste – the waste that cannot be recycled – being sent to landfill.

This will depend on exactly where you live, but the appearance of the proposed plants will be an important factor in their design to minimise impact on the local area. A detailed Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment has been prepared as part of the Environmental Statement and is available to view on the website in the Downloads section.

The EfW will be housed in a purpose-designed modern, streamlined building. The intention of the design is to use the tiered quarry platforms of the site to minimise the visual impact of the development. The topography of the quarry site means that many of the buildings on the site will not be visible from various locations. The new enclosed facilities will be in keeping with the surrounding area and a landscaping and planting programme will be undertaken to minimise visual impact further and to increase the diversity of local wildlife habitats.

The higher EfW building and flue will be seen in longer views although rendered photomontages demonstrate that this impact will be relatively modest. The proposed EfW facility will include a stack which will be 80 metres in height. The height of the stack is determined by the need to be elevated above the quarry face for dispersal of steam emissions.

The proposed MBT will have the capacity to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste, however it is likely to treat approximately 245,000 tonnes per year. Materials such as metals, plastics and other recyclable products will be extracted from the waste at the mechanical treatment stage using automated separation equipment and manual hand picking. The organic rich material of the waste remaining after recyclate extraction will be treated in the Bio-drying Tunnels to reduce its mass and improve the combustion characteristics of the material. Following the MBT process, any material which cannot be recycled will be conveyed to the EfW plant as a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) for recovery. All stages of the MBT operations are undertaken in purpose-designed, fully enclosed buildings, thus preventing noise, dust and smells from escaping.

The proposed EfW plant will have a thermal capacity of 68MWTH and is expected to accept and treat approximately 211,000 tonnes of waste per annum. The Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) generated in the MBT will be conveyed directly to the EfW bunker where it will be mixed with commercial and industrial waste to produce a fuel. The heat produced from the combustion of the fuel will be used primarily to generate electricity of which approximately 14MW will be exported to the grid.

In addition to electricity export, up to 10MW of the heat produced in the EfW may also be used to supply potential ‘heat off-take’, which could be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

The proposed MBT will have the capacity to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste, however it is likely to treat approximately 245,000 tonnes per year. Materials such as metals, plastics and other recyclable products will be extracted from the waste at the mechanical treatment stage using automated separation equipment and manual hand picking. The organic rich material of the waste remaining after recyclate extraction will be treated in the Bio-drying Tunnels to reduce its mass and improve the combustion characteristics of the material. Following the MBT process, any material which cannot be recycled will be conveyed to the EfW plant as a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) for recovery. All stages of the MBT operations are undertaken in purpose-designed, fully enclosed buildings, thus preventing noise, dust and smells from escaping.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process with a thermal capacity of 68MWTH and is expected to accept and treat approximately 211,000 tonnes of waste per annum. The Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) generated in the MBT will be conveyed directly to the EfW bunker where it will be mixed with commercial and industrial waste to produce a fuel. The heat produced from the combustion of the fuel will be used primarily to generate electricity of which approximately 14MW will be exported to the grid.

In addition to electricity export, up to 10MW of the heat produced in the EfW may also be used to supply potential ‘heat off-take’, which could be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

MBT building – 14 m
EFW building – 52 m
EFW Stack – 80 m

The site will be operational 24 hours per day seven days a week however the majority of arc21 waste is expected to be delivered from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm Saturdays. On occasion it will be necessary to deliver waste to the site outside of these hours when requested by the Authority, and this will be by prior arrangement. All Third Party Waste deliveries will run concurrently with Authority Waste deliveries.

The site will be operational 24 hours per day seven days a week however the majority of arc21 waste is expected to be delivered from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm Saturdays. On occasion it will be necessary to deliver waste to the site outside of these hours when requested by the Authority, and this will be by prior arrangement. All Third Party Waste deliveries will run concurrently with Authority Waste deliveries.

Yes. The ash generated in the EfW will be processed on site to produce a material which can be used as an aggregate in the construction industry.

Yes. The ash generated in the EfW incineration process will be processed on site to produce a material which can be used as an aggregate in the construction industry.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The technology is proven, reliable and strictly regulated. To be allowed to operate, the EfW facility will require an Environmental Permit which is only issued if the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) is satisfied that people and the environment are protected.

Once operational the proposed plants will be regulated by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and will comply with the strict emission limits set under the Environmental Permit and the Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU). The emissions from the EfW will be constantly monitored to ensure that the plant always operates within the limits set out in the Environmental Permit.

The total investment in these facilities will be £240 million.

The Becon Consortium plans to build a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant, an Energy from Waste (EfW) plant and a Visitor Centre at the Hightown Quarry site on the Boghill Road, Mallusk. This will enable arc21, the umbrella waste body for 11 Councils in the East of Northern Ireland, meet European landfill diversion targets and manage its waste more sustainably.

This project represents a major investment for Northern Ireland – approximately £240 million in development and construction alone. In the construction of the new waste facilities, local contractors will be used wherever possible, thereby maximising opportunities for employment and benefiting the wider local economy. An independent economic assessment estimates it will support 337 permanent direct and indirect jobs when the plants are operational.

The project is subject to receiving planning permission and we are currently involved in the PAD process which encourages submission of draft planning application documentation for review by DoE Strategic Projects team and its consultees. We hope to submit the formal planning application by autumn 2013. We will continue to engage with DoE and its consultees to try and secure a planning decision as soon as possible.

The project is subject to receiving planning permission. The planning application was submitted in March 2014 and a notice of opinion was issued by the then Minister Of the Environment, Mark H Durkan to refuse planning in September 2015. His notice of opinion was contrary to that of his Departmental officials who recommended a notice to approve. The application has now been referred to the Planning Appeals Commission for an appeal hearing scheduled for October 2016. Ultimately it will be the Minister for the Department of Infrastructure who will determine planning.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Mallusk
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The technology is proven, reliable and strictly regulated. To be allowed to operate, the EfW facility will require an Environmental Permit which is only issued if the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) is satisfied that people and the environment are protected.

Once operational the proposed plants will be regulated by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and will comply with the strict emission limits set under the Environmental Permit and the Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU). The emissions from the EfW will be constantly monitored to ensure that the plant always operates within the limits set out in the Environmental Permit.

The total investment in these facilities will be £240 million.

The Becon Consortium plans to build a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant, an Energy from Waste (EfW) plant using an incinerator with energy recovery process and a Visitor Centre at the Hightown Quarry site on the Boghill Road, Mallusk. This will enable arc21, the umbrella waste body for 6 Councils in the East of Northern Ireland, meet European landfill diversion targets and manage its waste more sustainably.

This project represents a major investment for Northern Ireland – approximately £240 million in development and construction alone. In the construction of the new waste facilities, local contractors will be used wherever possible, thereby maximising opportunities for employment and benefiting the wider local economy. An independent economic assessment estimates it will support 337 permanent direct and indirect jobs when the plants are operational.

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Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

One of the permit requirements will be that there is no noticeable odour and frequent checks will be carried out to ensure this is strictly enforced. A number of measures will be employed to ensure that odours are contained within the facilities, including ventilation, negative air pressure and bio-filter systems. All waste will be handled inside fully contained buildings and all vehicles bringing waste to site will be covered to prevent odours escaping.

Over the 41 month construction phase it is estimated that 2,701 direct job years of employment will be created or sustained of which 2,220 job years will directly relate to construction activities. At the peak of the construction activities it is estimated that upwards of 455 construction workers will be engaged on the site.

Once fully operational it is estimated that 94 full time permanent jobs will be created at the new waste processing facilities at the Hightown Quarry site. An additional 243 indirect and / or induced jobs will also be created or sustained in the wider Northern Ireland economy as a result of the on-going operations at the Hightown Quarry site.

arc21 is the umbrella waste management group for 11 councils in the east of Northern Ireland and is the procuring authority for this project. The proposed infrastructure will complement existing recycling and composting facilities in Northern Ireland which process material collected by the arc21 councils.

At present, arc21’s region accounts for 54% of all Northern Ireland’s municipal waste – 518,000 tonnes for the year to March 2012. Household recycling rates have jumped to over 39% from just 7.5% in 2000. arc21’s aim is to continue to improve recycling rates.

The technology proposed is part of the overarching solution to radically improve waste management in the arc21 area and is identified as part of the preferred mix of treatment solutions set out in the arc21 Waste Management Plan.

The development of these facilities is subject to the completion of the ongoing arc21 procurement process, securing planning permission and the attainment of various regulatory permits.

The project is subject to planning permission, so it is difficult to say at this stage when construction will commence. What we can say is that from receipt of planning permission we would aim to have the site constructed and in full operation within four years.

Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

The project is subject to planning permission, so it is difficult to say at this stage when construction will commence. What we can say is that from receipt of planning permission we would aim to have the site constructed and in full operation within four years.

arc21 is the umbrella waste management group for 6 councils in the east of Northern Ireland and is the procuring authority for this project. The proposed infrastructure will complement existing recycling and composting facilities in Northern Ireland which process material collected by the arc21 councils.

At present, arc21’s region accounts for 55% of all Northern Ireland’s municipal waste – 508,426 tonnes for the year to March 2015. Household recycling rates have jumped to over 41.5% from just 7.5% in 2000. arc21’s aim is to continue to improve recycling rates.

The technology proposed is part of the overarching solution to radically improve waste management in the arc21 area and is identified as part of the preferred mix of treatment solutions set out in the arc21 Waste Management Plan.

The development of these facilities is subject to the completion of the ongoing arc21 procurement process, securing planning permission and the attainment of various regulatory permits.

One of the permit requirements will be that there is no noticeable odour and frequent checks will be carried out to ensure this is strictly enforced. A number of measures will be employed to ensure that odours are contained within the facilities, including ventilation, negative air pressure and bio-filter systems. All waste will be handled inside fully contained buildings and all vehicles bringing waste to site will be covered to prevent odours escaping.

Over the 41 month construction phase it is estimated that 2,701 direct job years of employment will be created or sustained of which 2,220 job years will directly relate to construction activities. At the peak of the construction activities it is estimated that upwards of 455 construction workers will be engaged on the site.

Once fully operational it is estimated that 94 full time permanent jobs will be created at the new waste processing facilities at the Hightown Quarry site. An additional 243 indirect and / or induced jobs will also be created or sustained in the wider Northern Ireland economy as a result of the on-going operations at the Hightown Quarry site.

The Consortium was free to choose a suitable site anywhere in the arc21 region, either from a list of available sites provided by arc21 or using its own alternative.

Following a comprehensive site selection process the Hightown quarry site was chosen because:

The design of the facility will minimise noise impacts and any equipment with the potential to be noisy will be located within acoustically insulated buildings.

A noise impact assessment has been undertaken as part of the Environmental Statement and demonstrates that the site will operate to satisfactory levels. The removal of blasting, crushing and quarrying activity will improve the baseline noise levels on the site.

The scale of the project marks it out as one of regional significance and as such its planning will be managed by the Department of the Environment (DoE) Planning’s ‘Strategic Projects’ team. Major projects are known as ‘Article 31’ projects as they trigger that part of the Planning Order. The Department identifies those applications that are to be treated as major and its decision on an Article 31 application is final.

Having considered the application, including representations from the public, the Department may decide to request the Planning Appeals Commission (PAC) to hold a local public inquiry. Alternatively, the Department may serve a notice on the applicant indicating the decision which it proposes to make (referred to as a Notice of Opinion). This can be a Notice of Opinion to Approve or Refuse. The applicant may request a hearing before the Commission within the period specified in the Notice of Opinion.

The PAC is an independent body which, at the request of the DoE conducts Inquiries or Hearings to consider major planning applications.

This project delivers a necessary solution for waste management within the overall arc21 area which will divert residual waste (the remaining waste which can’t be recycled or reused) from landfill. This will help NI achieve its environmental obligations on waste management and in the process help avoid landfill tax and potential fines from EU for failing to meet our targets.

This project will also bring investment into Northern Ireland at a time when it is much needed. The local area will benefit from 455 construction jobs at the peak of the on-site construction activities and create/sustain approximately 340 direct and indirect jobs annually during operation. Wherever possible the suppliers and sub-contractors under consideration for contract awards will be drawn from the locality of the Hightown Quarry site in the first instance and Northern Ireland in general in accordance with the Project’s commitment to equality and sustainable development. There will also be opportunities for young people from the local area to take part in apprentice training schemes.

The Consortium aims to source substantial quantities of construction materials such as concrete, steel and metal cladding from local suppliers. 25% of the materials required for the EfW plant will be sourced locally, and 50% of the materials required for the construction of the MBT plant.
The Consortium proposes to deliver a long-term sustainable solution designed to maximise the value from waste and the intent is that the Project will therefore become an integral part of the local community. The Consortium will be fully committed to playing its part in supporting the local community. As an example of this, the facilities will include a state of the art Visitor Centre which will not only be made available to the local community but which will add to the local tourist/visitor offering, attracting an estimated 3,000 visitors per annum. It will also act as a useful resource for local schools and colleges to support their learning programme.

The driving force behind the Becon Consortium is E.ON Energy from Waste (EEW) which develops, builds, finances and operates EfW plants throughout Europe and has a proven track record of integrity, reliability and environmental performance. The company is currently owned by the E.ON Group. However, agreement has been reached on the sale of EEW to a joint venture comprising the EQT Fund and E.ON SE. This is subject to final approval by the EU Antitrust Authority which is anticipated in the first half of 2013. EQT is a group of leading private equity funds with investments in Northern and Eastern Europe, Asia and the US. The group’s activities focus on infrastructure, growth financing and buyouts.

Directly, or through subsidiaries and associated companies, EEW currently owns and operates 19 EfW facilities, including plants in Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The company’s plants handle approximately five million tonnes of municipal and industrial waste each year and generate up to 2,900GWh of steam/heat and up to 2,800GWh of electricity.

For further details visit www.eon-energyfromwaste.com

The Consortium was free to choose a suitable site anywhere in the arc21 region, either from a list of available sites provided by arc21 or using its own alternative.

Following a comprehensive site selection process the Hightown quarry site, Mallusk was chosen because:

The scale of the project marks it out as one of regional significance and as such its planning will be managed by the Department of the Environment (DoE) Planning’s ‘Strategic Projects’ team. Major projects are known as ‘Article 31’ projects as they trigger that part of the Planning Order. The Department identifies those applications that are to be treated as major and its decision on an Article 31 application is final.

Having considered the application, including representations from the public, the Departmental Minister serves a notice on the applicant indicating the decision which it proposes to make (referred to as a Notice of Opinion). This can be a Notice of Opinion to Approve or Refuse. In this instance the then Minister issued a Notice of Opinion to refuse in September 2015 (which was contrary to the recommendation of his departmental officials)

The applicant has subsequently requested an Appeal Hearing in front of the Planning Appeals Commission (PAC). The PAC is an independent body which, at the request of the DoE conducts Inquiries or Hearings to consider major planning applications.

The Hearing will be held in October 2016 with a report then being forward to the Department and a final decision by the Minister for Infrastructure.

The Becon Consortium was formed to pursue the opportunity created by arc21’s public procurement for its residual waste treatment project. The location and design of the proposals developed by the Becon Consortium in respect of the project and key milestones are set out on this website.

The company behind the Becon Consortium is Indaver (NI) Ltd (previously known as EEW Energy from Waste UK Limited). During the latter part of 2015 and the early part of 2016, Indaver (NI) Ltd was acquired from EEW Energy from Waste GmBH by Indaver N.V.

Indaver N.V. has for over 25 years been providing integrated waste management services to public authorities. These partnerships deliver services which include: the treatment of municipal waste; the organisation of waste management systems and the development and management of specialised waste treatment facilities.

In 2011 Indaver completed the construction of the first municipal Energy from Waste plant on the island of Ireland. The plant located at Duleek, Co. Meath provides a thermal treatment and recovery solution for 230,000 tonnes of household and commercial waste annually while generating renewable electricity to power 20,000 homes. Each year, across 6 European countries, Indaver manages more than 5 million tonnes of waste, the majority of which is either recovered as energy or recycled.

For further details visit www.indaver.com

The design of the facility will minimise noise impacts and any equipment with the potential to be noisy will be located within acoustically insulated buildings.

A noise impact assessment has been undertaken as part of the Environmental Statement and demonstrates that the site will operate to satisfactory levels. The removal of blasting, crushing and quarrying activity will improve the baseline noise levels

This project delivers a necessary solution for waste management within the overall arc21 area which will divert residual waste (the remaining waste which can’t be recycled or reused) from landfill. This will help NI achieve its environmental obligations on waste management and in the process help avoid landfill tax and potential fines from EU for failing to meet our targets.

This project will also bring investment into Northern Ireland at a time when it is much needed. The local area will benefit from 455 construction jobs at the peak of the on-site construction activities and create/sustain approximately 340 direct and indirect jobs annually during operation. Wherever possible the suppliers and sub-contractors under consideration for contract awards will be drawn from the locality of the Hightown Quarry site in the first instance and Northern Ireland in general in accordance with the Project’s commitment to equality and sustainable development. There will also be opportunities for young people from the local area to take part in apprentice training schemes.

The Consortium aims to source substantial quantities of construction materials such as concrete, steel and metal cladding from local suppliers. 25% of the materials required for the EfW plant will be sourced locally, and 50% of the materials required for the construction of the MBT plant.

The Consortium proposes to deliver a long-term sustainable solution designed to maximise the value from waste and the intent is that the Project will therefore become an integral part of the local community. The Consortium will be fully committed to playing its part in supporting the local community.
As an example of this, the facilities will include a state of the art Visitor Centre which will not only be made available to the local community but which will add to the local tourist/visitor offering, attracting an estimated 3,000 visitors per annum. It will also act as a useful resource for local schools and colleges to support their learning programme.

No. The proposed plant will not emit smoke, with any visible plume being colourless steam which will be invisible, except in very cold and dry weather conditions when some condensation vapour may be visible. All emissions from the facility will be tightly controlled and monitored 24 hours a day, and will go through a state of the art cleaning process to ensure there is no unacceptable impact on the environment or air quality. A detailed Air Quality Impact Assessment is being submitted as part of the planning application which will outline all air quality considerations.

The average coal-fired power station will annually emit over 100 times more sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides than a typical EfW plant. Compared to coal or oil-fired power stations, EfWs emit less fossil CO₂. EfW facilities actually help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting waste away from landfill, and have a significantly more positive effect on climate protection.

Before a planning application is submitted, the Becon Consortium intends to carry out an extensive pre-application consultation programme on the proposals. This will include:

Feedback facilities for the local community will be made available via newsletters and Drop In exhibition events to allow people to provide their comments on the proposals. There will also be an online feedback facility on the website. We are keen to hear your views and feedback as these will inform our final planning application.

Later in the process, the consortium will hold an Open Day for local businesses so they can meet the Project Team and discuss potential opportunities for working on the development.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020 under the EU Landfill Directive. If we don’t meet these targets we could face heavy financial penalties for non-compliance.

Locating the facilities in the arc21 area is entirely consistent with the proximity and self-sufficiency principles outlined in European Waste Management Law. The proximity principle advocates that waste should be disposed of (or otherwise managed) close to the point at which it is generated, thus aiming to achieve responsible self-sufficiency within a region. The Becon project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

The proposed facilities will help the 11 Councils to not only meet their EU landfill reduction targets, therefore avoiding potential fines, but will also help increase overall recycling levels within the arc21 area by up to 10%. The project will also export 14MW electricity to the National Grid, enough to power more than 30,000 homes, contributing to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets, while significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to using landfill.

We must reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and become more self-sufficient in terms of energy generation. This is crucial if we are to prosper economically, attract new investment and create jobs for future generations. This project will also contribute to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy target and greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020 under the EU Landfill Directive. If we don’t meet these targets we could face heavy financial penalties for non-compliance.

Locating the facilities in the arc21 area is entirely consistent with the proximity and self-sufficiency principles outlined in European Waste Management Law. The proximity principle advocates that waste should be disposed of (or otherwise managed) close to the point at which it is generated, thus aiming to achieve responsible self-sufficiency within a region. The Becon project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

The proposed facilities will help the 6 Councils to not only meet their EU landfill reduction targets, therefore avoiding potential fines, but will also help increase overall recycling levels within the arc21 area by up to 10%. The project will also export 14MW electricity to the National Grid, enough to power more than 30,000 homes, contributing to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets, while significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to using landfill.

We must reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and become more self-sufficient in terms of energy generation. This is crucial if we are to prosper economically, attract new investment and create jobs for future generations. This project will also contribute to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy target and greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Before a planning application is submitted, the Becon Consortium intends to carry out an extensive pre-application consultation programme on the proposals. This will include:

Feedback facilities for the local community will be made available via newsletters and Drop In exhibition events to allow people to provide their comments on the proposals. There will also be an online feedback facility on the website. We are keen to hear your views and feedback as these will inform our final planning application.

Later in the process, the consortium will hold an Open Day for local businesses so they can meet the Project Team and discuss potential opportunities for working on the development.

No. The proposed plant will not emit smoke, with any visible plume being colourless steam which will be invisible, except in very cold and dry weather conditions when some condensation vapour may be visible. All emissions from the facility will be tightly controlled and monitored 24 hours a day, and will go through a state of the art cleaning process to ensure there is no unacceptable impact on the environment or air quality. A detailed Air Quality Impact Assessment is being submitted as part of the planning application which will outline all air quality considerations.

The average coal-fired power station will annually emit over 100 times more sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides than a typical EfW plant. Compared to coal or oil-fired power stations, EfWs emit less fossil CO₂. EfW facilities actually help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting waste away from landfill, and have a significantly more positive effect on climate protection.

Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities are among the most tightly regulated industrial processes. Dioxins are a family of chemicals which are present in the environment and are a natural by-product of any combustion process. A modern EfW facility will take 100 years of constant operation to produce more dioxins than that emitted during 15 minutes worth of fireworks in London to celebrate the millennium.

The plants will help Northern Ireland to meet its landfill reduction targets and recycling targets, as well as contributing to our greenhouse gas reduction targets and renewable energy targets through producing sustainable energy.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020. This project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

At the same time, recycling will continue to be a major focus with an NI target of 60% for household recycling by 2020 currently under consideration. This project will increase arc21’s constituent Councils’ overall recycling rates by up to 10% through the extraction of plastics, metals, aggregates and other valuable materials.

We also have targets to produce a minimum of 40% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% based on 1990 levels by 2025. Using all our waste efficiently and effectively and treating it as a valuable resource will help meet these targets.
The Becon Project will contribute over 50,000 MWh per year to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets and reduce C0₂ Equivalent greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 tonnes per year relative to sending waste to landfill.

The plants will help Northern Ireland to meet its landfill reduction targets and recycling targets, as well as contributing to our greenhouse gas reduction targets and renewable energy targets through producing sustainable energy.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020. This project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

At the same time, recycling will continue to be a major focus with an NI target of 60% for household recycling by 2020 currently under consideration. This project will increase arc21’s constituent Councils’ overall recycling rates by up to 10% through the extraction of plastics, metals, aggregates and other valuable materials.

We also have targets to produce a minimum of 40% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% based on 1990 levels by 2025. Using all our waste efficiently and effectively and treating it as a valuable resource will help meet these targets. The Becon Project will contribute over 50,000 MWh per year to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets and reduce C0₂ Equivalent greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 tonnes per year relative to sending waste to landfill.

House prices are influenced by a wide variety of factors, the most important of those over recent times being a depressed economic climate.
While we fully appreciate that some people may have concerns about the potential impact of our project on house prices in the area, our experience tells us that these fears are often based on a lack of knowledge and understanding about the tried and tested technology that we are proposing. With over 20 years’ experience of delivering and operating 19 similar facilities across Europe we are not aware of any evidence that the development or presence of well managed waste facilities such as those we are proposing has any measurable or lasting impact on house prices or the saleability of homes in nearby areas. In fact some evidence suggests that in many cases their presence gives a benefit to the local community in terms of local investment and jobs and providing affordable district heating systems and electricity.
Our experience also tells us however that where there is a lack of understanding about these types of facilities that it is vitally important to share as much information with people to allow them to become more familiar with the proposals and the technologies, therefore addressing their concerns.
There have been a number of independent studies carried out across the UK and Ireland which have assessed the potential impact of similar facilities on house prices, and which draw on European experience. You may find them useful if you have any concerns about the potential impact on property prices in the area.
One UK study suggests that energy from waste plants/incinerators do not lead to decreased property values. Research in Hampshire, before and after the construction of three incinerators in the last seven years, found that there was “no noticeable or lasting adverse effect on the property markets in those locations due to the presence of the incinerators”. You can find the report here

In all three locations values have continued to rise in line with other areas in their local markets. In addition there has been substantial investment/development in both the residential and commercial sectors in the areas around the plants in the periods following grant of planning consent and construction. This has continued once the plants have become operational”. Cluttons Surveyors

Independent research was also carried out into the potential impact of the Poolbeg Thermal Treatment Plant in Dublin on local property values. This study also focused on available evidence elsewhere across Europe where these facilities exist in many urban area near local housing.
The research carried out indicated that ‘there appears to be have been no impact on house prices or the volume of properties being offered for sale in the vicinity of Poolbeg since it was announced in 2001.’ The full report can be found at http://www.dublinwastetoenergy.ie/uploads/archive/files/briefs-of-evidence/marie-hunt.pdf

Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities are among the most tightly regulated industrial processes. Dioxins are a family of chemicals which are present in the environment and are a natural by-product of any combustion process. A modern EfW facility will take 100 years of constant operation to produce more dioxins than that emitted during 15 minutes worth of fireworks in London to celebrate the millennium.

In addition to the Environmental Impact Assessment set to protect the environment and health, a voluntary Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been commissioned to draw from and build upon the regulatory assessment to further investigate and address local community concerns. The scope and focus of the HIA has been discussed with the Public Health Agency and Environmental Health Officers, and will be further refined through the issues and opportunities raised by local communities through the comprehensive consultation exercise.

The final HIA will apply the current scientific evidence base to test the UK Health Protection Agency’s position, that modern, well run facilities present a negligible impact on local air quality and no measurable risk to health.

A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant is a type of waste processing facility that combines an automated mechanical pre-sorting facility and a form of biological treatment.

The mechanical treatment component of the plant typically resembles a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and separates different materials to allow for efficient management of the waste. The biological treatment can include composting, bio-drying or anaerobic digestion. The type of waste treatment being proposed in the MBT plant is widely used in Great Britain and Europe. A recent study on MBT plants in Europe suggests that there are more than 330 plants currently in operation with a capacity to treat up to 33 million tonnes annually.

A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant is a type of waste processing facility that combines an automated mechanical pre-sorting facility and a form of biological treatment.

The mechanical treatment component of the plant typically resembles a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and separates different materials to allow for efficient management of the waste. The biological treatment can include composting, bio-drying or anaerobic digestion. The type of waste treatment being proposed in the MBT plant is widely used in Great Britain and Europe. A recent study on MBT plants in Europe suggests that there are more than 330 plants currently in operation with a capacity to treat up to 33 million tonnes annually.

In addition to the Environmental Impact Assessment set to protect the environment and health, a voluntary Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been commissioned to draw from and build upon the regulatory assessment to further investigate and address local community concerns. The scope and focus of the HIA has been discussed with the Public Health Agency and Environmental Health Officers, and will be further refined through the issues and opportunities raised by local communities through the comprehensive consultation exercise.

The final HIA will apply the current scientific evidence base to test the UK Health Protection Agency’s position, that modern, well run facilities present a negligible impact on local air quality and no measurable risk to health.

Much of the traffic that will be going to the site is currently already in the local area going to landfill.
Subject to final approval, vehicles are expected to travel to the facility between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. Vehicles travelling to the facility will be fully covered and cleaned regularly. There is a wheel wash system located next to the exit which will be used by all outgoing vehicles.

Detailed traffic studies and planning has indicated that on average there will be a total of 199 vehicles arriving and 199 vehicles departing the site per day. The vehicle mix is made up of 118 HGV movements and 81 car movements.
The average flow will total 11 vehicles arriving (7 HGV trips & 4 car trips) and 11 vehicles departing (7 HGV trips & 4 car trips) per hour when the site is operational.

Energy from Waste (EfW) technology involves the thermal treatment of waste to release energy that is then used to generate steam and electricity. Thermal waste treatment is a tried and tested technology that ensures the safe and environmentally responsible treatment of waste. EfW plants have operated throughout continental Europe for decades, with over 450 plants in operation today. Many of these are located in countries with long established ‘green’ credentials such as the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany alone, some 24 million tonnes of waste a year are processed in EfW plants. In Great Britain, there are currently 36 EfW plants consented or in operation.

The proposed EfW plant will incorporate the latest emissions technologies used successfully across Continental Europe. Employing EfW technology is compatible with high levels of recycling, evident in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. These countries use EfW extensively yet have combined recycling and composting rates of over 50%.

Energy from Waste (EfW) technology involves the thermal treatment of waste to release energy that is then used to generate steam and electricity. Thermal waste treatment is a tried and tested technology that ensures the safe and environmentally responsible treatment of waste. EfW plants have operated throughout continental Europe for decades, with over 450 plants in operation today. Many of these are located in countries with long established ‘green’ credentials such as the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany alone, some 24 million tonnes of waste a year are processed in EfW plants. In Great Britain, there are currently 36 EfW plants consented or in operation.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process and will incorporate the latest emissions technologies used successfully across Continental Europe. Employing EfW technology is compatible with high levels of recycling, evident in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. These countries use EfW extensively yet have combined recycling and composting rates of over 50%.

Much of the traffic that will be going to the site is currently already in the local area going to landfill.
Subject to final approval, vehicles are expected to travel to the facility between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. Vehicles travelling to the facility will be fully covered and cleaned regularly. There is a wheel wash system located next to the exit which will be used by all outgoing vehicles.

Detailed traffic studies and planning has indicated that on average there will be a total of 224 vehicles arriving and 224 vehicles departing the site per day. The vehicle mix is made up of 143 HGV movements and 81 car movements.
The average vehicle flow will total 20 vehicles arriving (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) and 20 vehicles departing (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) when the site is operational.

The average daily numbers of HGV vehicle movements to the site over the ten year period of quarrying activity between 1999 and 2008 was 89 one-way (in-bound) trips. The net change in the number of HGV daily trips anticipated with the proposed development is extremely modest with some 118 HGVs anticipated on a daily basis.

In heat energy terms the EfW has an annual capacity of 68MWTHERMAL. The facility will be able to export approximately 14MWELECTRIC of electricity to the grid, which will provide over 100,000 MWh per year, enough electricity to power over 30,000 homes.

The heat produced in the EfW will be used primarily to generate electricity but will also be used to supply a number of heat requirements on the site such as the MBT biological treatment and other onsite facilities. Up to 10MWTH of heat, in addition to electricity export, could be available for potential heat off-take which can be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

In heat energy terms the EfW has an annual capacity of 68MWTHERMAL. The facility will be able to export approximately 14MWELECTRIC of electricity to the grid, which will provide over 100,000 MWh per year, enough electricity to power over 30,000 homes.

The heat produced in the EfW will be used primarily to generate electricity but will also be used to supply a number of heat requirements on the site such as the MBT biological treatment and other onsite facilities. Up to 10MWTH of heat, in addition to electricity export, could be available for potential heat off-take which can be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

The average daily numbers of HGV vehicle movements to the site over the ten year period of quarrying activity between 1999 and 2008 was 89 one-way (in-bound) trips. The net change in the number of HGV daily trips anticipated with the proposed development is extremely modest with some 118 HGVs anticipated on a daily basis.

Significant infrastructural improvements will include widening of the Boghill Road along a 1.2km stretch from the junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Rd to the access road to the site. The road will be widened to a 6.7m carriageway with a 2m footpath on its northern side – a substantial improvement from its current condition, which at its narrowest is only 4m wide. The junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Road will also be enhanced to improve sightlines.

There are a number of benefits in co-locating the two facilities on the same site:


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There are a number of benefits in co-locating the two facilities on the same site in Hightown Quarry, Mallusk:

Our Traffic Assessment shows that operational traffic (HGV and cars) for the proposed Becon site is largely concentrated on accessing and using the motorway network and will involve the diversion of much of the waste traffic currently making its way to Cottonmount Landfill (where nine of the 11 Councils residual waste is currently going) to the Hightown Quarry site.
It is anticipated that over 82% of site vehicles (HGVs and cars) will access the site from the Sandyknowles/ M2 junction with over 67% originating from the M2 itself. On entering the Mallusk area we are proposing that this traffic will turn left towards the Hightown Road and then turn right onto the Hightown Road. At the top of the Hightown Road it will turn right onto HydePark Road and then immediate left on the Boghill Road, where it will make its way to the site.
It is anticipated that around 17.5 % of the vehicles will continue to use the Mallusk Road and then follow the same route above to access the Boghill Road site entrance.

This will depend on exactly where you live, but the appearance of the proposed plants will be an important factor in their design to minimise impact on the local area. A detailed Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment has been prepared as part of the Environmental Statement and is available to view on the website in the Downloads section.

The EfW will be housed in a purpose-designed modern, streamlined building. The intention of the design is to use the tiered quarry platforms of the site to minimise the visual impact of the development. The topography of the quarry site means that many of the buildings on the site will not be visible from various locations. The new enclosed facilities will be in keeping with the surrounding area and a landscaping and planting programme will be undertaken to minimise visual impact further and to increase the diversity of local wildlife habitats.

The higher EfW building and flue will be seen in longer views although rendered photomontages demonstrate that this impact will be relatively modest. The proposed EfW facility will include a stack which will be 80 metres in height. The height of the stack is determined by the need to be elevated above the quarry face for dispersal of steam emissions.

Up to 90% of the waste delivered to the site is expected to be municipal residual waste (black bin waste) from the 11 arc21 councils. The remaining waste, which will be used to fill the EfW to capacity to maximise efficiency and electricity generation, will be commercial and industrial waste sourced from a third party.

Up to 90% of the waste delivered to the site is expected to be municipal residual waste (black bin waste) from the 6 arc21 councils. The remaining waste, which will be used to fill the EfW to capacity to maximise efficiency and electricity generation, will be commercial and industrial waste sourced from a third party.

Historically, quarry operations at Hightown have at times also generated substantially more HGV traffic than the proposed development. Given the unrestricted nature of the quarry planning permission, the potential to generate high volumes of quarry traffic at any time of the day still remains and with little prospect of road improvements or controls in place.
With this project however, a number of important road improvements will me made and controls put in place to ensure the timing of waste deliveries will be restricted to between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. The routes used will also be clearly agreed and communicated with the drivers of all vehicles accessing and exiting the Hightown site. These routes will be tightly monitored and controlled, with route direction signs located at appropriate points to direct vehicles onto the specified routes to be used. Where persistent breaches of Becon’s instructions are recorded the offending drivers will receive a verbal warning and if the breaches continue the driver will be suspended from accessing the site and where appropriate the driver’s employer will be advised of the suspension.

MBT building – 14 m
EFW building – 52 m
EFW Stack – 80 m

The site has been designed to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste in any given year, which will be split between the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility (capacity 300,000 tonnes) and the Energy from Waste (EfW) facility (capacity 68MWTH). For the year 2019/20, based on the assumed waste composition and projected waste tonnages the MBT is expected to accept and treat 241,319 tonnes of arc21 Municipal Waste and the EfW is expected to thermally treat 211,000 tonnes of fuel generated in the MBT and Third Party Waste.

The site has been designed to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste in any given year, which will be split between the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility (capacity 300,000 tonnes) and the Energy from Waste (EfW) facility (capacity 68MWTH). For the year 2019/20, based on the assumed waste composition and projected waste tonnages the MBT is expected to accept and treat 241,319 tonnes of arc21 Municipal Waste and the EfW is expected to thermally treat 211,000 tonnes of fuel generated in the MBT and Third Party Waste.

Significant infrastructural improvements will include widening of the Boghill Road along a 1.2km stretch from the junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Rd to the access road to the site. The road will be widened to a 6.7m carriageway with a 2m footpath on its northern side – a substantial improvement from its current condition, which at its narrowest is only 4m wide. The junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Road will also be enhanced to improve sightlines.

Yes, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing the region’s waste. The Becon Consortium will work with arc21 to encourage people to minimise waste and to increase reuse and recycling. However, not all waste can be dealt with in this way and the proposed facilities are urgently needed to reduce the amount of residual waste – the waste that cannot be recycled – being sent to landfill.

Yes, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing the region’s waste. The Becon Consortium will work with arc21 to encourage people to minimise waste and to increase reuse and recycling. However, not all waste can be dealt with in this way and the proposed facilities are urgently needed to reduce the amount of residual waste – the waste that cannot be recycled – being sent to landfill.

This will depend on exactly where you live, but the appearance of the proposed plants will be an important factor in their design to minimise impact on the local area. A detailed Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment has been prepared as part of the Environmental Statement and is available to view on the website in the Downloads section.

The EfW will be housed in a purpose-designed modern, streamlined building. The intention of the design is to use the tiered quarry platforms of the site to minimise the visual impact of the development. The topography of the quarry site means that many of the buildings on the site will not be visible from various locations. The new enclosed facilities will be in keeping with the surrounding area and a landscaping and planting programme will be undertaken to minimise visual impact further and to increase the diversity of local wildlife habitats.

The higher EfW building and flue will be seen in longer views although rendered photomontages demonstrate that this impact will be relatively modest. The proposed EfW facility will include a stack which will be 80 metres in height. The height of the stack is determined by the need to be elevated above the quarry face for dispersal of steam emissions.

The proposed MBT will have the capacity to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste, however it is likely to treat approximately 245,000 tonnes per year. Materials such as metals, plastics and other recyclable products will be extracted from the waste at the mechanical treatment stage using automated separation equipment and manual hand picking. The organic rich material of the waste remaining after recyclate extraction will be treated in the Bio-drying Tunnels to reduce its mass and improve the combustion characteristics of the material. Following the MBT process, any material which cannot be recycled will be conveyed to the EfW plant as a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) for recovery. All stages of the MBT operations are undertaken in purpose-designed, fully enclosed buildings, thus preventing noise, dust and smells from escaping.

The proposed EfW plant will have a thermal capacity of 68MWTH and is expected to accept and treat approximately 211,000 tonnes of waste per annum. The Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) generated in the MBT will be conveyed directly to the EfW bunker where it will be mixed with commercial and industrial waste to produce a fuel. The heat produced from the combustion of the fuel will be used primarily to generate electricity of which approximately 14MW will be exported to the grid.

In addition to electricity export, up to 10MW of the heat produced in the EfW may also be used to supply potential ‘heat off-take’, which could be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

The proposed MBT will have the capacity to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste, however it is likely to treat approximately 245,000 tonnes per year. Materials such as metals, plastics and other recyclable products will be extracted from the waste at the mechanical treatment stage using automated separation equipment and manual hand picking. The organic rich material of the waste remaining after recyclate extraction will be treated in the Bio-drying Tunnels to reduce its mass and improve the combustion characteristics of the material. Following the MBT process, any material which cannot be recycled will be conveyed to the EfW plant as a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) for recovery. All stages of the MBT operations are undertaken in purpose-designed, fully enclosed buildings, thus preventing noise, dust and smells from escaping.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process with a thermal capacity of 68MWTH and is expected to accept and treat approximately 211,000 tonnes of waste per annum. The Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) generated in the MBT will be conveyed directly to the EfW bunker where it will be mixed with commercial and industrial waste to produce a fuel. The heat produced from the combustion of the fuel will be used primarily to generate electricity of which approximately 14MW will be exported to the grid.

In addition to electricity export, up to 10MW of the heat produced in the EfW may also be used to supply potential ‘heat off-take’, which could be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

MBT building – 14 m
EFW building – 52 m
EFW Stack – 80 m

The site will be operational 24 hours per day seven days a week however the majority of arc21 waste is expected to be delivered from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm Saturdays. On occasion it will be necessary to deliver waste to the site outside of these hours when requested by the Authority, and this will be by prior arrangement. All Third Party Waste deliveries will run concurrently with Authority Waste deliveries.

The site will be operational 24 hours per day seven days a week however the majority of arc21 waste is expected to be delivered from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm Saturdays. On occasion it will be necessary to deliver waste to the site outside of these hours when requested by the Authority, and this will be by prior arrangement. All Third Party Waste deliveries will run concurrently with Authority Waste deliveries.

Yes. The ash generated in the EfW will be processed on site to produce a material which can be used as an aggregate in the construction industry.

Yes. The ash generated in the EfW incineration process will be processed on site to produce a material which can be used as an aggregate in the construction industry.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The technology is proven, reliable and strictly regulated. To be allowed to operate, the EfW facility will require an Environmental Permit which is only issued if the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) is satisfied that people and the environment are protected.

Once operational the proposed plants will be regulated by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and will comply with the strict emission limits set under the Environmental Permit and the Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU). The emissions from the EfW will be constantly monitored to ensure that the plant always operates within the limits set out in the Environmental Permit.

The total investment in these facilities will be £240 million.

The Becon Consortium plans to build a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant, an Energy from Waste (EfW) plant and a Visitor Centre at the Hightown Quarry site on the Boghill Road, Mallusk. This will enable arc21, the umbrella waste body for 11 Councils in the East of Northern Ireland, meet European landfill diversion targets and manage its waste more sustainably.

This project represents a major investment for Northern Ireland – approximately £240 million in development and construction alone. In the construction of the new waste facilities, local contractors will be used wherever possible, thereby maximising opportunities for employment and benefiting the wider local economy. An independent economic assessment estimates it will support 337 permanent direct and indirect jobs when the plants are operational.

The project is subject to receiving planning permission and we are currently involved in the PAD process which encourages submission of draft planning application documentation for review by DoE Strategic Projects team and its consultees. We hope to submit the formal planning application by autumn 2013. We will continue to engage with DoE and its consultees to try and secure a planning decision as soon as possible.

The project is subject to receiving planning permission. The planning application was submitted in March 2014 and a notice of opinion was issued by the then Minister Of the Environment, Mark H Durkan to refuse planning in September 2015. His notice of opinion was contrary to that of his Departmental officials who recommended a notice to approve. The application has now been referred to the Planning Appeals Commission for an appeal hearing scheduled for October 2016. Ultimately it will be the Minister for the Department of Infrastructure who will determine planning.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Mallusk
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The technology is proven, reliable and strictly regulated. To be allowed to operate, the EfW facility will require an Environmental Permit which is only issued if the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) is satisfied that people and the environment are protected.

Once operational the proposed plants will be regulated by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and will comply with the strict emission limits set under the Environmental Permit and the Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU). The emissions from the EfW will be constantly monitored to ensure that the plant always operates within the limits set out in the Environmental Permit.

The total investment in these facilities will be £240 million.

The Becon Consortium plans to build a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant, an Energy from Waste (EfW) plant using an incinerator with energy recovery process and a Visitor Centre at the Hightown Quarry site on the Boghill Road, Mallusk. This will enable arc21, the umbrella waste body for 6 Councils in the East of Northern Ireland, meet European landfill diversion targets and manage its waste more sustainably.

This project represents a major investment for Northern Ireland – approximately £240 million in development and construction alone. In the construction of the new waste facilities, local contractors will be used wherever possible, thereby maximising opportunities for employment and benefiting the wider local economy. An independent economic assessment estimates it will support 337 permanent direct and indirect jobs when the plants are operational.

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Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

One of the permit requirements will be that there is no noticeable odour and frequent checks will be carried out to ensure this is strictly enforced. A number of measures will be employed to ensure that odours are contained within the facilities, including ventilation, negative air pressure and bio-filter systems. All waste will be handled inside fully contained buildings and all vehicles bringing waste to site will be covered to prevent odours escaping.

Over the 41 month construction phase it is estimated that 2,701 direct job years of employment will be created or sustained of which 2,220 job years will directly relate to construction activities. At the peak of the construction activities it is estimated that upwards of 455 construction workers will be engaged on the site.

Once fully operational it is estimated that 94 full time permanent jobs will be created at the new waste processing facilities at the Hightown Quarry site. An additional 243 indirect and / or induced jobs will also be created or sustained in the wider Northern Ireland economy as a result of the on-going operations at the Hightown Quarry site.

arc21 is the umbrella waste management group for 11 councils in the east of Northern Ireland and is the procuring authority for this project. The proposed infrastructure will complement existing recycling and composting facilities in Northern Ireland which process material collected by the arc21 councils.

At present, arc21’s region accounts for 54% of all Northern Ireland’s municipal waste – 518,000 tonnes for the year to March 2012. Household recycling rates have jumped to over 39% from just 7.5% in 2000. arc21’s aim is to continue to improve recycling rates.

The technology proposed is part of the overarching solution to radically improve waste management in the arc21 area and is identified as part of the preferred mix of treatment solutions set out in the arc21 Waste Management Plan.

The development of these facilities is subject to the completion of the ongoing arc21 procurement process, securing planning permission and the attainment of various regulatory permits.

The project is subject to planning permission, so it is difficult to say at this stage when construction will commence. What we can say is that from receipt of planning permission we would aim to have the site constructed and in full operation within four years.

Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

The project is subject to planning permission, so it is difficult to say at this stage when construction will commence. What we can say is that from receipt of planning permission we would aim to have the site constructed and in full operation within four years.

arc21 is the umbrella waste management group for 6 councils in the east of Northern Ireland and is the procuring authority for this project. The proposed infrastructure will complement existing recycling and composting facilities in Northern Ireland which process material collected by the arc21 councils.

At present, arc21’s region accounts for 55% of all Northern Ireland’s municipal waste – 508,426 tonnes for the year to March 2015. Household recycling rates have jumped to over 41.5% from just 7.5% in 2000. arc21’s aim is to continue to improve recycling rates.

The technology proposed is part of the overarching solution to radically improve waste management in the arc21 area and is identified as part of the preferred mix of treatment solutions set out in the arc21 Waste Management Plan.

The development of these facilities is subject to the completion of the ongoing arc21 procurement process, securing planning permission and the attainment of various regulatory permits.

One of the permit requirements will be that there is no noticeable odour and frequent checks will be carried out to ensure this is strictly enforced. A number of measures will be employed to ensure that odours are contained within the facilities, including ventilation, negative air pressure and bio-filter systems. All waste will be handled inside fully contained buildings and all vehicles bringing waste to site will be covered to prevent odours escaping.

Over the 41 month construction phase it is estimated that 2,701 direct job years of employment will be created or sustained of which 2,220 job years will directly relate to construction activities. At the peak of the construction activities it is estimated that upwards of 455 construction workers will be engaged on the site.

Once fully operational it is estimated that 94 full time permanent jobs will be created at the new waste processing facilities at the Hightown Quarry site. An additional 243 indirect and / or induced jobs will also be created or sustained in the wider Northern Ireland economy as a result of the on-going operations at the Hightown Quarry site.

The Consortium was free to choose a suitable site anywhere in the arc21 region, either from a list of available sites provided by arc21 or using its own alternative.

Following a comprehensive site selection process the Hightown quarry site was chosen because:

The design of the facility will minimise noise impacts and any equipment with the potential to be noisy will be located within acoustically insulated buildings.

A noise impact assessment has been undertaken as part of the Environmental Statement and demonstrates that the site will operate to satisfactory levels. The removal of blasting, crushing and quarrying activity will improve the baseline noise levels on the site.

The scale of the project marks it out as one of regional significance and as such its planning will be managed by the Department of the Environment (DoE) Planning’s ‘Strategic Projects’ team. Major projects are known as ‘Article 31’ projects as they trigger that part of the Planning Order. The Department identifies those applications that are to be treated as major and its decision on an Article 31 application is final.

Having considered the application, including representations from the public, the Department may decide to request the Planning Appeals Commission (PAC) to hold a local public inquiry. Alternatively, the Department may serve a notice on the applicant indicating the decision which it proposes to make (referred to as a Notice of Opinion). This can be a Notice of Opinion to Approve or Refuse. The applicant may request a hearing before the Commission within the period specified in the Notice of Opinion.

The PAC is an independent body which, at the request of the DoE conducts Inquiries or Hearings to consider major planning applications.

This project delivers a necessary solution for waste management within the overall arc21 area which will divert residual waste (the remaining waste which can’t be recycled or reused) from landfill. This will help NI achieve its environmental obligations on waste management and in the process help avoid landfill tax and potential fines from EU for failing to meet our targets.

This project will also bring investment into Northern Ireland at a time when it is much needed. The local area will benefit from 455 construction jobs at the peak of the on-site construction activities and create/sustain approximately 340 direct and indirect jobs annually during operation. Wherever possible the suppliers and sub-contractors under consideration for contract awards will be drawn from the locality of the Hightown Quarry site in the first instance and Northern Ireland in general in accordance with the Project’s commitment to equality and sustainable development. There will also be opportunities for young people from the local area to take part in apprentice training schemes.

The Consortium aims to source substantial quantities of construction materials such as concrete, steel and metal cladding from local suppliers. 25% of the materials required for the EfW plant will be sourced locally, and 50% of the materials required for the construction of the MBT plant.
The Consortium proposes to deliver a long-term sustainable solution designed to maximise the value from waste and the intent is that the Project will therefore become an integral part of the local community. The Consortium will be fully committed to playing its part in supporting the local community. As an example of this, the facilities will include a state of the art Visitor Centre which will not only be made available to the local community but which will add to the local tourist/visitor offering, attracting an estimated 3,000 visitors per annum. It will also act as a useful resource for local schools and colleges to support their learning programme.

The driving force behind the Becon Consortium is E.ON Energy from Waste (EEW) which develops, builds, finances and operates EfW plants throughout Europe and has a proven track record of integrity, reliability and environmental performance. The company is currently owned by the E.ON Group. However, agreement has been reached on the sale of EEW to a joint venture comprising the EQT Fund and E.ON SE. This is subject to final approval by the EU Antitrust Authority which is anticipated in the first half of 2013. EQT is a group of leading private equity funds with investments in Northern and Eastern Europe, Asia and the US. The group’s activities focus on infrastructure, growth financing and buyouts.

Directly, or through subsidiaries and associated companies, EEW currently owns and operates 19 EfW facilities, including plants in Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The company’s plants handle approximately five million tonnes of municipal and industrial waste each year and generate up to 2,900GWh of steam/heat and up to 2,800GWh of electricity.

For further details visit www.eon-energyfromwaste.com

The Consortium was free to choose a suitable site anywhere in the arc21 region, either from a list of available sites provided by arc21 or using its own alternative.

Following a comprehensive site selection process the Hightown quarry site, Mallusk was chosen because:

The scale of the project marks it out as one of regional significance and as such its planning will be managed by the Department of the Environment (DoE) Planning’s ‘Strategic Projects’ team. Major projects are known as ‘Article 31’ projects as they trigger that part of the Planning Order. The Department identifies those applications that are to be treated as major and its decision on an Article 31 application is final.

Having considered the application, including representations from the public, the Departmental Minister serves a notice on the applicant indicating the decision which it proposes to make (referred to as a Notice of Opinion). This can be a Notice of Opinion to Approve or Refuse. In this instance the then Minister issued a Notice of Opinion to refuse in September 2015 (which was contrary to the recommendation of his departmental officials)

The applicant has subsequently requested an Appeal Hearing in front of the Planning Appeals Commission (PAC). The PAC is an independent body which, at the request of the DoE conducts Inquiries or Hearings to consider major planning applications.

The Hearing will be held in October 2016 with a report then being forward to the Department and a final decision by the Minister for Infrastructure.

The Becon Consortium was formed to pursue the opportunity created by arc21’s public procurement for its residual waste treatment project. The location and design of the proposals developed by the Becon Consortium in respect of the project and key milestones are set out on this website.

The company behind the Becon Consortium is Indaver (NI) Ltd (previously known as EEW Energy from Waste UK Limited). During the latter part of 2015 and the early part of 2016, Indaver (NI) Ltd was acquired from EEW Energy from Waste GmBH by Indaver N.V.

Indaver N.V. has for over 25 years been providing integrated waste management services to public authorities. These partnerships deliver services which include: the treatment of municipal waste; the organisation of waste management systems and the development and management of specialised waste treatment facilities.

In 2011 Indaver completed the construction of the first municipal Energy from Waste plant on the island of Ireland. The plant located at Duleek, Co. Meath provides a thermal treatment and recovery solution for 230,000 tonnes of household and commercial waste annually while generating renewable electricity to power 20,000 homes. Each year, across 6 European countries, Indaver manages more than 5 million tonnes of waste, the majority of which is either recovered as energy or recycled.

For further details visit www.indaver.com

The design of the facility will minimise noise impacts and any equipment with the potential to be noisy will be located within acoustically insulated buildings.

A noise impact assessment has been undertaken as part of the Environmental Statement and demonstrates that the site will operate to satisfactory levels. The removal of blasting, crushing and quarrying activity will improve the baseline noise levels

This project delivers a necessary solution for waste management within the overall arc21 area which will divert residual waste (the remaining waste which can’t be recycled or reused) from landfill. This will help NI achieve its environmental obligations on waste management and in the process help avoid landfill tax and potential fines from EU for failing to meet our targets.

This project will also bring investment into Northern Ireland at a time when it is much needed. The local area will benefit from 455 construction jobs at the peak of the on-site construction activities and create/sustain approximately 340 direct and indirect jobs annually during operation. Wherever possible the suppliers and sub-contractors under consideration for contract awards will be drawn from the locality of the Hightown Quarry site in the first instance and Northern Ireland in general in accordance with the Project’s commitment to equality and sustainable development. There will also be opportunities for young people from the local area to take part in apprentice training schemes.

The Consortium aims to source substantial quantities of construction materials such as concrete, steel and metal cladding from local suppliers. 25% of the materials required for the EfW plant will be sourced locally, and 50% of the materials required for the construction of the MBT plant.

The Consortium proposes to deliver a long-term sustainable solution designed to maximise the value from waste and the intent is that the Project will therefore become an integral part of the local community. The Consortium will be fully committed to playing its part in supporting the local community.
As an example of this, the facilities will include a state of the art Visitor Centre which will not only be made available to the local community but which will add to the local tourist/visitor offering, attracting an estimated 3,000 visitors per annum. It will also act as a useful resource for local schools and colleges to support their learning programme.

No. The proposed plant will not emit smoke, with any visible plume being colourless steam which will be invisible, except in very cold and dry weather conditions when some condensation vapour may be visible. All emissions from the facility will be tightly controlled and monitored 24 hours a day, and will go through a state of the art cleaning process to ensure there is no unacceptable impact on the environment or air quality. A detailed Air Quality Impact Assessment is being submitted as part of the planning application which will outline all air quality considerations.

The average coal-fired power station will annually emit over 100 times more sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides than a typical EfW plant. Compared to coal or oil-fired power stations, EfWs emit less fossil CO₂. EfW facilities actually help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting waste away from landfill, and have a significantly more positive effect on climate protection.

Before a planning application is submitted, the Becon Consortium intends to carry out an extensive pre-application consultation programme on the proposals. This will include:

Feedback facilities for the local community will be made available via newsletters and Drop In exhibition events to allow people to provide their comments on the proposals. There will also be an online feedback facility on the website. We are keen to hear your views and feedback as these will inform our final planning application.

Later in the process, the consortium will hold an Open Day for local businesses so they can meet the Project Team and discuss potential opportunities for working on the development.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020 under the EU Landfill Directive. If we don’t meet these targets we could face heavy financial penalties for non-compliance.

Locating the facilities in the arc21 area is entirely consistent with the proximity and self-sufficiency principles outlined in European Waste Management Law. The proximity principle advocates that waste should be disposed of (or otherwise managed) close to the point at which it is generated, thus aiming to achieve responsible self-sufficiency within a region. The Becon project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

The proposed facilities will help the 11 Councils to not only meet their EU landfill reduction targets, therefore avoiding potential fines, but will also help increase overall recycling levels within the arc21 area by up to 10%. The project will also export 14MW electricity to the National Grid, enough to power more than 30,000 homes, contributing to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets, while significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to using landfill.

We must reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and become more self-sufficient in terms of energy generation. This is crucial if we are to prosper economically, attract new investment and create jobs for future generations. This project will also contribute to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy target and greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020 under the EU Landfill Directive. If we don’t meet these targets we could face heavy financial penalties for non-compliance.

Locating the facilities in the arc21 area is entirely consistent with the proximity and self-sufficiency principles outlined in European Waste Management Law. The proximity principle advocates that waste should be disposed of (or otherwise managed) close to the point at which it is generated, thus aiming to achieve responsible self-sufficiency within a region. The Becon project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

The proposed facilities will help the 6 Councils to not only meet their EU landfill reduction targets, therefore avoiding potential fines, but will also help increase overall recycling levels within the arc21 area by up to 10%. The project will also export 14MW electricity to the National Grid, enough to power more than 30,000 homes, contributing to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets, while significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to using landfill.

We must reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and become more self-sufficient in terms of energy generation. This is crucial if we are to prosper economically, attract new investment and create jobs for future generations. This project will also contribute to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy target and greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Before a planning application is submitted, the Becon Consortium intends to carry out an extensive pre-application consultation programme on the proposals. This will include:

Feedback facilities for the local community will be made available via newsletters and Drop In exhibition events to allow people to provide their comments on the proposals. There will also be an online feedback facility on the website. We are keen to hear your views and feedback as these will inform our final planning application.

Later in the process, the consortium will hold an Open Day for local businesses so they can meet the Project Team and discuss potential opportunities for working on the development.

No. The proposed plant will not emit smoke, with any visible plume being colourless steam which will be invisible, except in very cold and dry weather conditions when some condensation vapour may be visible. All emissions from the facility will be tightly controlled and monitored 24 hours a day, and will go through a state of the art cleaning process to ensure there is no unacceptable impact on the environment or air quality. A detailed Air Quality Impact Assessment is being submitted as part of the planning application which will outline all air quality considerations.

The average coal-fired power station will annually emit over 100 times more sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides than a typical EfW plant. Compared to coal or oil-fired power stations, EfWs emit less fossil CO₂. EfW facilities actually help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting waste away from landfill, and have a significantly more positive effect on climate protection.

Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities are among the most tightly regulated industrial processes. Dioxins are a family of chemicals which are present in the environment and are a natural by-product of any combustion process. A modern EfW facility will take 100 years of constant operation to produce more dioxins than that emitted during 15 minutes worth of fireworks in London to celebrate the millennium.

The plants will help Northern Ireland to meet its landfill reduction targets and recycling targets, as well as contributing to our greenhouse gas reduction targets and renewable energy targets through producing sustainable energy.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020. This project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

At the same time, recycling will continue to be a major focus with an NI target of 60% for household recycling by 2020 currently under consideration. This project will increase arc21’s constituent Councils’ overall recycling rates by up to 10% through the extraction of plastics, metals, aggregates and other valuable materials.

We also have targets to produce a minimum of 40% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% based on 1990 levels by 2025. Using all our waste efficiently and effectively and treating it as a valuable resource will help meet these targets.
The Becon Project will contribute over 50,000 MWh per year to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets and reduce C0₂ Equivalent greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 tonnes per year relative to sending waste to landfill.

The plants will help Northern Ireland to meet its landfill reduction targets and recycling targets, as well as contributing to our greenhouse gas reduction targets and renewable energy targets through producing sustainable energy.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020. This project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

At the same time, recycling will continue to be a major focus with an NI target of 60% for household recycling by 2020 currently under consideration. This project will increase arc21’s constituent Councils’ overall recycling rates by up to 10% through the extraction of plastics, metals, aggregates and other valuable materials.

We also have targets to produce a minimum of 40% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% based on 1990 levels by 2025. Using all our waste efficiently and effectively and treating it as a valuable resource will help meet these targets. The Becon Project will contribute over 50,000 MWh per year to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets and reduce C0₂ Equivalent greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 tonnes per year relative to sending waste to landfill.

House prices are influenced by a wide variety of factors, the most important of those over recent times being a depressed economic climate.
While we fully appreciate that some people may have concerns about the potential impact of our project on house prices in the area, our experience tells us that these fears are often based on a lack of knowledge and understanding about the tried and tested technology that we are proposing. With over 20 years’ experience of delivering and operating 19 similar facilities across Europe we are not aware of any evidence that the development or presence of well managed waste facilities such as those we are proposing has any measurable or lasting impact on house prices or the saleability of homes in nearby areas. In fact some evidence suggests that in many cases their presence gives a benefit to the local community in terms of local investment and jobs and providing affordable district heating systems and electricity.
Our experience also tells us however that where there is a lack of understanding about these types of facilities that it is vitally important to share as much information with people to allow them to become more familiar with the proposals and the technologies, therefore addressing their concerns.
There have been a number of independent studies carried out across the UK and Ireland which have assessed the potential impact of similar facilities on house prices, and which draw on European experience. You may find them useful if you have any concerns about the potential impact on property prices in the area.
One UK study suggests that energy from waste plants/incinerators do not lead to decreased property values. Research in Hampshire, before and after the construction of three incinerators in the last seven years, found that there was “no noticeable or lasting adverse effect on the property markets in those locations due to the presence of the incinerators”. You can find the report here

In all three locations values have continued to rise in line with other areas in their local markets. In addition there has been substantial investment/development in both the residential and commercial sectors in the areas around the plants in the periods following grant of planning consent and construction. This has continued once the plants have become operational”. Cluttons Surveyors

Independent research was also carried out into the potential impact of the Poolbeg Thermal Treatment Plant in Dublin on local property values. This study also focused on available evidence elsewhere across Europe where these facilities exist in many urban area near local housing.
The research carried out indicated that ‘there appears to be have been no impact on house prices or the volume of properties being offered for sale in the vicinity of Poolbeg since it was announced in 2001.’ The full report can be found at http://www.dublinwastetoenergy.ie/uploads/archive/files/briefs-of-evidence/marie-hunt.pdf

Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities are among the most tightly regulated industrial processes. Dioxins are a family of chemicals which are present in the environment and are a natural by-product of any combustion process. A modern EfW facility will take 100 years of constant operation to produce more dioxins than that emitted during 15 minutes worth of fireworks in London to celebrate the millennium.

In addition to the Environmental Impact Assessment set to protect the environment and health, a voluntary Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been commissioned to draw from and build upon the regulatory assessment to further investigate and address local community concerns. The scope and focus of the HIA has been discussed with the Public Health Agency and Environmental Health Officers, and will be further refined through the issues and opportunities raised by local communities through the comprehensive consultation exercise.

The final HIA will apply the current scientific evidence base to test the UK Health Protection Agency’s position, that modern, well run facilities present a negligible impact on local air quality and no measurable risk to health.

A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant is a type of waste processing facility that combines an automated mechanical pre-sorting facility and a form of biological treatment.

The mechanical treatment component of the plant typically resembles a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and separates different materials to allow for efficient management of the waste. The biological treatment can include composting, bio-drying or anaerobic digestion. The type of waste treatment being proposed in the MBT plant is widely used in Great Britain and Europe. A recent study on MBT plants in Europe suggests that there are more than 330 plants currently in operation with a capacity to treat up to 33 million tonnes annually.

A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant is a type of waste processing facility that combines an automated mechanical pre-sorting facility and a form of biological treatment.

The mechanical treatment component of the plant typically resembles a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and separates different materials to allow for efficient management of the waste. The biological treatment can include composting, bio-drying or anaerobic digestion. The type of waste treatment being proposed in the MBT plant is widely used in Great Britain and Europe. A recent study on MBT plants in Europe suggests that there are more than 330 plants currently in operation with a capacity to treat up to 33 million tonnes annually.

In addition to the Environmental Impact Assessment set to protect the environment and health, a voluntary Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been commissioned to draw from and build upon the regulatory assessment to further investigate and address local community concerns. The scope and focus of the HIA has been discussed with the Public Health Agency and Environmental Health Officers, and will be further refined through the issues and opportunities raised by local communities through the comprehensive consultation exercise.

The final HIA will apply the current scientific evidence base to test the UK Health Protection Agency’s position, that modern, well run facilities present a negligible impact on local air quality and no measurable risk to health.

Much of the traffic that will be going to the site is currently already in the local area going to landfill.
Subject to final approval, vehicles are expected to travel to the facility between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. Vehicles travelling to the facility will be fully covered and cleaned regularly. There is a wheel wash system located next to the exit which will be used by all outgoing vehicles.

Detailed traffic studies and planning has indicated that on average there will be a total of 199 vehicles arriving and 199 vehicles departing the site per day. The vehicle mix is made up of 118 HGV movements and 81 car movements.
The average flow will total 11 vehicles arriving (7 HGV trips & 4 car trips) and 11 vehicles departing (7 HGV trips & 4 car trips) per hour when the site is operational.

Energy from Waste (EfW) technology involves the thermal treatment of waste to release energy that is then used to generate steam and electricity. Thermal waste treatment is a tried and tested technology that ensures the safe and environmentally responsible treatment of waste. EfW plants have operated throughout continental Europe for decades, with over 450 plants in operation today. Many of these are located in countries with long established ‘green’ credentials such as the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany alone, some 24 million tonnes of waste a year are processed in EfW plants. In Great Britain, there are currently 36 EfW plants consented or in operation.

The proposed EfW plant will incorporate the latest emissions technologies used successfully across Continental Europe. Employing EfW technology is compatible with high levels of recycling, evident in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. These countries use EfW extensively yet have combined recycling and composting rates of over 50%.

Energy from Waste (EfW) technology involves the thermal treatment of waste to release energy that is then used to generate steam and electricity. Thermal waste treatment is a tried and tested technology that ensures the safe and environmentally responsible treatment of waste. EfW plants have operated throughout continental Europe for decades, with over 450 plants in operation today. Many of these are located in countries with long established ‘green’ credentials such as the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany alone, some 24 million tonnes of waste a year are processed in EfW plants. In Great Britain, there are currently 36 EfW plants consented or in operation.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process and will incorporate the latest emissions technologies used successfully across Continental Europe. Employing EfW technology is compatible with high levels of recycling, evident in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. These countries use EfW extensively yet have combined recycling and composting rates of over 50%.

Much of the traffic that will be going to the site is currently already in the local area going to landfill.
Subject to final approval, vehicles are expected to travel to the facility between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. Vehicles travelling to the facility will be fully covered and cleaned regularly. There is a wheel wash system located next to the exit which will be used by all outgoing vehicles.

Detailed traffic studies and planning has indicated that on average there will be a total of 224 vehicles arriving and 224 vehicles departing the site per day. The vehicle mix is made up of 143 HGV movements and 81 car movements.
The average vehicle flow will total 20 vehicles arriving (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) and 20 vehicles departing (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) when the site is operational.

The average daily numbers of HGV vehicle movements to the site over the ten year period of quarrying activity between 1999 and 2008 was 89 one-way (in-bound) trips. The net change in the number of HGV daily trips anticipated with the proposed development is extremely modest with some 118 HGVs anticipated on a daily basis.

In heat energy terms the EfW has an annual capacity of 68MWTHERMAL. The facility will be able to export approximately 14MWELECTRIC of electricity to the grid, which will provide over 100,000 MWh per year, enough electricity to power over 30,000 homes.

The heat produced in the EfW will be used primarily to generate electricity but will also be used to supply a number of heat requirements on the site such as the MBT biological treatment and other onsite facilities. Up to 10MWTH of heat, in addition to electricity export, could be available for potential heat off-take which can be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

In heat energy terms the EfW has an annual capacity of 68MWTHERMAL. The facility will be able to export approximately 14MWELECTRIC of electricity to the grid, which will provide over 100,000 MWh per year, enough electricity to power over 30,000 homes.

The heat produced in the EfW will be used primarily to generate electricity but will also be used to supply a number of heat requirements on the site such as the MBT biological treatment and other onsite facilities. Up to 10MWTH of heat, in addition to electricity export, could be available for potential heat off-take which can be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

The average daily numbers of HGV vehicle movements to the site over the ten year period of quarrying activity between 1999 and 2008 was 89 one-way (in-bound) trips. The net change in the number of HGV daily trips anticipated with the proposed development is extremely modest with some 118 HGVs anticipated on a daily basis.

Significant infrastructural improvements will include widening of the Boghill Road along a 1.2km stretch from the junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Rd to the access road to the site. The road will be widened to a 6.7m carriageway with a 2m footpath on its northern side – a substantial improvement from its current condition, which at its narrowest is only 4m wide. The junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Road will also be enhanced to improve sightlines.

There are a number of benefits in co-locating the two facilities on the same site:


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There are a number of benefits in co-locating the two facilities on the same site in Hightown Quarry, Mallusk:

Our Traffic Assessment shows that operational traffic (HGV and cars) for the proposed Becon site is largely concentrated on accessing and using the motorway network and will involve the diversion of much of the waste traffic currently making its way to Cottonmount Landfill (where nine of the 11 Councils residual waste is currently going) to the Hightown Quarry site.
It is anticipated that over 82% of site vehicles (HGVs and cars) will access the site from the Sandyknowles/ M2 junction with over 67% originating from the M2 itself. On entering the Mallusk area we are proposing that this traffic will turn left towards the Hightown Road and then turn right onto the Hightown Road. At the top of the Hightown Road it will turn right onto HydePark Road and then immediate left on the Boghill Road, where it will make its way to the site.
It is anticipated that around 17.5 % of the vehicles will continue to use the Mallusk Road and then follow the same route above to access the Boghill Road site entrance.

This will depend on exactly where you live, but the appearance of the proposed plants will be an important factor in their design to minimise impact on the local area. A detailed Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment has been prepared as part of the Environmental Statement and is available to view on the website in the Downloads section.

The EfW will be housed in a purpose-designed modern, streamlined building. The intention of the design is to use the tiered quarry platforms of the site to minimise the visual impact of the development. The topography of the quarry site means that many of the buildings on the site will not be visible from various locations. The new enclosed facilities will be in keeping with the surrounding area and a landscaping and planting programme will be undertaken to minimise visual impact further and to increase the diversity of local wildlife habitats.

The higher EfW building and flue will be seen in longer views although rendered photomontages demonstrate that this impact will be relatively modest. The proposed EfW facility will include a stack which will be 80 metres in height. The height of the stack is determined by the need to be elevated above the quarry face for dispersal of steam emissions.

Up to 90% of the waste delivered to the site is expected to be municipal residual waste (black bin waste) from the 11 arc21 councils. The remaining waste, which will be used to fill the EfW to capacity to maximise efficiency and electricity generation, will be commercial and industrial waste sourced from a third party.

Up to 90% of the waste delivered to the site is expected to be municipal residual waste (black bin waste) from the 6 arc21 councils. The remaining waste, which will be used to fill the EfW to capacity to maximise efficiency and electricity generation, will be commercial and industrial waste sourced from a third party.

Historically, quarry operations at Hightown have at times also generated substantially more HGV traffic than the proposed development. Given the unrestricted nature of the quarry planning permission, the potential to generate high volumes of quarry traffic at any time of the day still remains and with little prospect of road improvements or controls in place.
With this project however, a number of important road improvements will me made and controls put in place to ensure the timing of waste deliveries will be restricted to between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. The routes used will also be clearly agreed and communicated with the drivers of all vehicles accessing and exiting the Hightown site. These routes will be tightly monitored and controlled, with route direction signs located at appropriate points to direct vehicles onto the specified routes to be used. Where persistent breaches of Becon’s instructions are recorded the offending drivers will receive a verbal warning and if the breaches continue the driver will be suspended from accessing the site and where appropriate the driver’s employer will be advised of the suspension.

MBT building – 14 m
EFW building – 52 m
EFW Stack – 80 m

The site has been designed to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste in any given year, which will be split between the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility (capacity 300,000 tonnes) and the Energy from Waste (EfW) facility (capacity 68MWTH). For the year 2019/20, based on the assumed waste composition and projected waste tonnages the MBT is expected to accept and treat 241,319 tonnes of arc21 Municipal Waste and the EfW is expected to thermally treat 211,000 tonnes of fuel generated in the MBT and Third Party Waste.

The site has been designed to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste in any given year, which will be split between the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility (capacity 300,000 tonnes) and the Energy from Waste (EfW) facility (capacity 68MWTH). For the year 2019/20, based on the assumed waste composition and projected waste tonnages the MBT is expected to accept and treat 241,319 tonnes of arc21 Municipal Waste and the EfW is expected to thermally treat 211,000 tonnes of fuel generated in the MBT and Third Party Waste.

Significant infrastructural improvements will include widening of the Boghill Road along a 1.2km stretch from the junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Rd to the access road to the site. The road will be widened to a 6.7m carriageway with a 2m footpath on its northern side – a substantial improvement from its current condition, which at its narrowest is only 4m wide. The junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Road will also be enhanced to improve sightlines.

Yes, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing the region’s waste. The Becon Consortium will work with arc21 to encourage people to minimise waste and to increase reuse and recycling. However, not all waste can be dealt with in this way and the proposed facilities are urgently needed to reduce the amount of residual waste – the waste that cannot be recycled – being sent to landfill.

Yes, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing the region’s waste. The Becon Consortium will work with arc21 to encourage people to minimise waste and to increase reuse and recycling. However, not all waste can be dealt with in this way and the proposed facilities are urgently needed to reduce the amount of residual waste – the waste that cannot be recycled – being sent to landfill.

This will depend on exactly where you live, but the appearance of the proposed plants will be an important factor in their design to minimise impact on the local area. A detailed Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment has been prepared as part of the Environmental Statement and is available to view on the website in the Downloads section.

The EfW will be housed in a purpose-designed modern, streamlined building. The intention of the design is to use the tiered quarry platforms of the site to minimise the visual impact of the development. The topography of the quarry site means that many of the buildings on the site will not be visible from various locations. The new enclosed facilities will be in keeping with the surrounding area and a landscaping and planting programme will be undertaken to minimise visual impact further and to increase the diversity of local wildlife habitats.

The higher EfW building and flue will be seen in longer views although rendered photomontages demonstrate that this impact will be relatively modest. The proposed EfW facility will include a stack which will be 80 metres in height. The height of the stack is determined by the need to be elevated above the quarry face for dispersal of steam emissions.

The proposed MBT will have the capacity to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste, however it is likely to treat approximately 245,000 tonnes per year. Materials such as metals, plastics and other recyclable products will be extracted from the waste at the mechanical treatment stage using automated separation equipment and manual hand picking. The organic rich material of the waste remaining after recyclate extraction will be treated in the Bio-drying Tunnels to reduce its mass and improve the combustion characteristics of the material. Following the MBT process, any material which cannot be recycled will be conveyed to the EfW plant as a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) for recovery. All stages of the MBT operations are undertaken in purpose-designed, fully enclosed buildings, thus preventing noise, dust and smells from escaping.

The proposed EfW plant will have a thermal capacity of 68MWTH and is expected to accept and treat approximately 211,000 tonnes of waste per annum. The Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) generated in the MBT will be conveyed directly to the EfW bunker where it will be mixed with commercial and industrial waste to produce a fuel. The heat produced from the combustion of the fuel will be used primarily to generate electricity of which approximately 14MW will be exported to the grid.

In addition to electricity export, up to 10MW of the heat produced in the EfW may also be used to supply potential ‘heat off-take’, which could be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

The proposed MBT will have the capacity to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste, however it is likely to treat approximately 245,000 tonnes per year. Materials such as metals, plastics and other recyclable products will be extracted from the waste at the mechanical treatment stage using automated separation equipment and manual hand picking. The organic rich material of the waste remaining after recyclate extraction will be treated in the Bio-drying Tunnels to reduce its mass and improve the combustion characteristics of the material. Following the MBT process, any material which cannot be recycled will be conveyed to the EfW plant as a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) for recovery. All stages of the MBT operations are undertaken in purpose-designed, fully enclosed buildings, thus preventing noise, dust and smells from escaping.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process with a thermal capacity of 68MWTH and is expected to accept and treat approximately 211,000 tonnes of waste per annum. The Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) generated in the MBT will be conveyed directly to the EfW bunker where it will be mixed with commercial and industrial waste to produce a fuel. The heat produced from the combustion of the fuel will be used primarily to generate electricity of which approximately 14MW will be exported to the grid.

In addition to electricity export, up to 10MW of the heat produced in the EfW may also be used to supply potential ‘heat off-take’, which could be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

MBT building – 14 m
EFW building – 52 m
EFW Stack – 80 m

The site will be operational 24 hours per day seven days a week however the majority of arc21 waste is expected to be delivered from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm Saturdays. On occasion it will be necessary to deliver waste to the site outside of these hours when requested by the Authority, and this will be by prior arrangement. All Third Party Waste deliveries will run concurrently with Authority Waste deliveries.

The site will be operational 24 hours per day seven days a week however the majority of arc21 waste is expected to be delivered from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm Saturdays. On occasion it will be necessary to deliver waste to the site outside of these hours when requested by the Authority, and this will be by prior arrangement. All Third Party Waste deliveries will run concurrently with Authority Waste deliveries.

Yes. The ash generated in the EfW will be processed on site to produce a material which can be used as an aggregate in the construction industry.

Yes. The ash generated in the EfW incineration process will be processed on site to produce a material which can be used as an aggregate in the construction industry.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The technology is proven, reliable and strictly regulated. To be allowed to operate, the EfW facility will require an Environmental Permit which is only issued if the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) is satisfied that people and the environment are protected.

Once operational the proposed plants will be regulated by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and will comply with the strict emission limits set under the Environmental Permit and the Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU). The emissions from the EfW will be constantly monitored to ensure that the plant always operates within the limits set out in the Environmental Permit.

The total investment in these facilities will be £240 million.

The Becon Consortium plans to build a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant, an Energy from Waste (EfW) plant and a Visitor Centre at the Hightown Quarry site on the Boghill Road, Mallusk. This will enable arc21, the umbrella waste body for 11 Councils in the East of Northern Ireland, meet European landfill diversion targets and manage its waste more sustainably.

This project represents a major investment for Northern Ireland – approximately £240 million in development and construction alone. In the construction of the new waste facilities, local contractors will be used wherever possible, thereby maximising opportunities for employment and benefiting the wider local economy. An independent economic assessment estimates it will support 337 permanent direct and indirect jobs when the plants are operational.

The project is subject to receiving planning permission and we are currently involved in the PAD process which encourages submission of draft planning application documentation for review by DoE Strategic Projects team and its consultees. We hope to submit the formal planning application by autumn 2013. We will continue to engage with DoE and its consultees to try and secure a planning decision as soon as possible.

The project is subject to receiving planning permission. The planning application was submitted in March 2014 and a notice of opinion was issued by the then Minister Of the Environment, Mark H Durkan to refuse planning in September 2015. His notice of opinion was contrary to that of his Departmental officials who recommended a notice to approve. The application has now been referred to the Planning Appeals Commission for an appeal hearing scheduled for October 2016. Ultimately it will be the Minister for the Department of Infrastructure who will determine planning.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Mallusk
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The technology is proven, reliable and strictly regulated. To be allowed to operate, the EfW facility will require an Environmental Permit which is only issued if the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) is satisfied that people and the environment are protected.

Once operational the proposed plants will be regulated by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and will comply with the strict emission limits set under the Environmental Permit and the Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU). The emissions from the EfW will be constantly monitored to ensure that the plant always operates within the limits set out in the Environmental Permit.

The total investment in these facilities will be £240 million.

The Becon Consortium plans to build a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant, an Energy from Waste (EfW) plant using an incinerator with energy recovery process and a Visitor Centre at the Hightown Quarry site on the Boghill Road, Mallusk. This will enable arc21, the umbrella waste body for 6 Councils in the East of Northern Ireland, meet European landfill diversion targets and manage its waste more sustainably.

This project represents a major investment for Northern Ireland – approximately £240 million in development and construction alone. In the construction of the new waste facilities, local contractors will be used wherever possible, thereby maximising opportunities for employment and benefiting the wider local economy. An independent economic assessment estimates it will support 337 permanent direct and indirect jobs when the plants are operational.

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Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

One of the permit requirements will be that there is no noticeable odour and frequent checks will be carried out to ensure this is strictly enforced. A number of measures will be employed to ensure that odours are contained within the facilities, including ventilation, negative air pressure and bio-filter systems. All waste will be handled inside fully contained buildings and all vehicles bringing waste to site will be covered to prevent odours escaping.

Over the 41 month construction phase it is estimated that 2,701 direct job years of employment will be created or sustained of which 2,220 job years will directly relate to construction activities. At the peak of the construction activities it is estimated that upwards of 455 construction workers will be engaged on the site.

Once fully operational it is estimated that 94 full time permanent jobs will be created at the new waste processing facilities at the Hightown Quarry site. An additional 243 indirect and / or induced jobs will also be created or sustained in the wider Northern Ireland economy as a result of the on-going operations at the Hightown Quarry site.

arc21 is the umbrella waste management group for 11 councils in the east of Northern Ireland and is the procuring authority for this project. The proposed infrastructure will complement existing recycling and composting facilities in Northern Ireland which process material collected by the arc21 councils.

At present, arc21’s region accounts for 54% of all Northern Ireland’s municipal waste – 518,000 tonnes for the year to March 2012. Household recycling rates have jumped to over 39% from just 7.5% in 2000. arc21’s aim is to continue to improve recycling rates.

The technology proposed is part of the overarching solution to radically improve waste management in the arc21 area and is identified as part of the preferred mix of treatment solutions set out in the arc21 Waste Management Plan.

The development of these facilities is subject to the completion of the ongoing arc21 procurement process, securing planning permission and the attainment of various regulatory permits.

The project is subject to planning permission, so it is difficult to say at this stage when construction will commence. What we can say is that from receipt of planning permission we would aim to have the site constructed and in full operation within four years.

Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

The project is subject to planning permission, so it is difficult to say at this stage when construction will commence. What we can say is that from receipt of planning permission we would aim to have the site constructed and in full operation within four years.

arc21 is the umbrella waste management group for 6 councils in the east of Northern Ireland and is the procuring authority for this project. The proposed infrastructure will complement existing recycling and composting facilities in Northern Ireland which process material collected by the arc21 councils.

At present, arc21’s region accounts for 55% of all Northern Ireland’s municipal waste – 508,426 tonnes for the year to March 2015. Household recycling rates have jumped to over 41.5% from just 7.5% in 2000. arc21’s aim is to continue to improve recycling rates.

The technology proposed is part of the overarching solution to radically improve waste management in the arc21 area and is identified as part of the preferred mix of treatment solutions set out in the arc21 Waste Management Plan.

The development of these facilities is subject to the completion of the ongoing arc21 procurement process, securing planning permission and the attainment of various regulatory permits.

One of the permit requirements will be that there is no noticeable odour and frequent checks will be carried out to ensure this is strictly enforced. A number of measures will be employed to ensure that odours are contained within the facilities, including ventilation, negative air pressure and bio-filter systems. All waste will be handled inside fully contained buildings and all vehicles bringing waste to site will be covered to prevent odours escaping.

Over the 41 month construction phase it is estimated that 2,701 direct job years of employment will be created or sustained of which 2,220 job years will directly relate to construction activities. At the peak of the construction activities it is estimated that upwards of 455 construction workers will be engaged on the site.

Once fully operational it is estimated that 94 full time permanent jobs will be created at the new waste processing facilities at the Hightown Quarry site. An additional 243 indirect and / or induced jobs will also be created or sustained in the wider Northern Ireland economy as a result of the on-going operations at the Hightown Quarry site.

The Consortium was free to choose a suitable site anywhere in the arc21 region, either from a list of available sites provided by arc21 or using its own alternative.

Following a comprehensive site selection process the Hightown quarry site was chosen because:

The design of the facility will minimise noise impacts and any equipment with the potential to be noisy will be located within acoustically insulated buildings.

A noise impact assessment has been undertaken as part of the Environmental Statement and demonstrates that the site will operate to satisfactory levels. The removal of blasting, crushing and quarrying activity will improve the baseline noise levels on the site.

The scale of the project marks it out as one of regional significance and as such its planning will be managed by the Department of the Environment (DoE) Planning’s ‘Strategic Projects’ team. Major projects are known as ‘Article 31’ projects as they trigger that part of the Planning Order. The Department identifies those applications that are to be treated as major and its decision on an Article 31 application is final.

Having considered the application, including representations from the public, the Department may decide to request the Planning Appeals Commission (PAC) to hold a local public inquiry. Alternatively, the Department may serve a notice on the applicant indicating the decision which it proposes to make (referred to as a Notice of Opinion). This can be a Notice of Opinion to Approve or Refuse. The applicant may request a hearing before the Commission within the period specified in the Notice of Opinion.

The PAC is an independent body which, at the request of the DoE conducts Inquiries or Hearings to consider major planning applications.

This project delivers a necessary solution for waste management within the overall arc21 area which will divert residual waste (the remaining waste which can’t be recycled or reused) from landfill. This will help NI achieve its environmental obligations on waste management and in the process help avoid landfill tax and potential fines from EU for failing to meet our targets.

This project will also bring investment into Northern Ireland at a time when it is much needed. The local area will benefit from 455 construction jobs at the peak of the on-site construction activities and create/sustain approximately 340 direct and indirect jobs annually during operation. Wherever possible the suppliers and sub-contractors under consideration for contract awards will be drawn from the locality of the Hightown Quarry site in the first instance and Northern Ireland in general in accordance with the Project’s commitment to equality and sustainable development. There will also be opportunities for young people from the local area to take part in apprentice training schemes.

The Consortium aims to source substantial quantities of construction materials such as concrete, steel and metal cladding from local suppliers. 25% of the materials required for the EfW plant will be sourced locally, and 50% of the materials required for the construction of the MBT plant.
The Consortium proposes to deliver a long-term sustainable solution designed to maximise the value from waste and the intent is that the Project will therefore become an integral part of the local community. The Consortium will be fully committed to playing its part in supporting the local community. As an example of this, the facilities will include a state of the art Visitor Centre which will not only be made available to the local community but which will add to the local tourist/visitor offering, attracting an estimated 3,000 visitors per annum. It will also act as a useful resource for local schools and colleges to support their learning programme.

The driving force behind the Becon Consortium is E.ON Energy from Waste (EEW) which develops, builds, finances and operates EfW plants throughout Europe and has a proven track record of integrity, reliability and environmental performance. The company is currently owned by the E.ON Group. However, agreement has been reached on the sale of EEW to a joint venture comprising the EQT Fund and E.ON SE. This is subject to final approval by the EU Antitrust Authority which is anticipated in the first half of 2013. EQT is a group of leading private equity funds with investments in Northern and Eastern Europe, Asia and the US. The group’s activities focus on infrastructure, growth financing and buyouts.

Directly, or through subsidiaries and associated companies, EEW currently owns and operates 19 EfW facilities, including plants in Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The company’s plants handle approximately five million tonnes of municipal and industrial waste each year and generate up to 2,900GWh of steam/heat and up to 2,800GWh of electricity.

For further details visit www.eon-energyfromwaste.com

The Consortium was free to choose a suitable site anywhere in the arc21 region, either from a list of available sites provided by arc21 or using its own alternative.

Following a comprehensive site selection process the Hightown quarry site, Mallusk was chosen because:

The scale of the project marks it out as one of regional significance and as such its planning will be managed by the Department of the Environment (DoE) Planning’s ‘Strategic Projects’ team. Major projects are known as ‘Article 31’ projects as they trigger that part of the Planning Order. The Department identifies those applications that are to be treated as major and its decision on an Article 31 application is final.

Having considered the application, including representations from the public, the Departmental Minister serves a notice on the applicant indicating the decision which it proposes to make (referred to as a Notice of Opinion). This can be a Notice of Opinion to Approve or Refuse. In this instance the then Minister issued a Notice of Opinion to refuse in September 2015 (which was contrary to the recommendation of his departmental officials)

The applicant has subsequently requested an Appeal Hearing in front of the Planning Appeals Commission (PAC). The PAC is an independent body which, at the request of the DoE conducts Inquiries or Hearings to consider major planning applications.

The Hearing will be held in October 2016 with a report then being forward to the Department and a final decision by the Minister for Infrastructure.

The Becon Consortium was formed to pursue the opportunity created by arc21’s public procurement for its residual waste treatment project. The location and design of the proposals developed by the Becon Consortium in respect of the project and key milestones are set out on this website.

The company behind the Becon Consortium is Indaver (NI) Ltd (previously known as EEW Energy from Waste UK Limited). During the latter part of 2015 and the early part of 2016, Indaver (NI) Ltd was acquired from EEW Energy from Waste GmBH by Indaver N.V.

Indaver N.V. has for over 25 years been providing integrated waste management services to public authorities. These partnerships deliver services which include: the treatment of municipal waste; the organisation of waste management systems and the development and management of specialised waste treatment facilities.

In 2011 Indaver completed the construction of the first municipal Energy from Waste plant on the island of Ireland. The plant located at Duleek, Co. Meath provides a thermal treatment and recovery solution for 230,000 tonnes of household and commercial waste annually while generating renewable electricity to power 20,000 homes. Each year, across 6 European countries, Indaver manages more than 5 million tonnes of waste, the majority of which is either recovered as energy or recycled.

For further details visit www.indaver.com

The design of the facility will minimise noise impacts and any equipment with the potential to be noisy will be located within acoustically insulated buildings.

A noise impact assessment has been undertaken as part of the Environmental Statement and demonstrates that the site will operate to satisfactory levels. The removal of blasting, crushing and quarrying activity will improve the baseline noise levels

This project delivers a necessary solution for waste management within the overall arc21 area which will divert residual waste (the remaining waste which can’t be recycled or reused) from landfill. This will help NI achieve its environmental obligations on waste management and in the process help avoid landfill tax and potential fines from EU for failing to meet our targets.

This project will also bring investment into Northern Ireland at a time when it is much needed. The local area will benefit from 455 construction jobs at the peak of the on-site construction activities and create/sustain approximately 340 direct and indirect jobs annually during operation. Wherever possible the suppliers and sub-contractors under consideration for contract awards will be drawn from the locality of the Hightown Quarry site in the first instance and Northern Ireland in general in accordance with the Project’s commitment to equality and sustainable development. There will also be opportunities for young people from the local area to take part in apprentice training schemes.

The Consortium aims to source substantial quantities of construction materials such as concrete, steel and metal cladding from local suppliers. 25% of the materials required for the EfW plant will be sourced locally, and 50% of the materials required for the construction of the MBT plant.

The Consortium proposes to deliver a long-term sustainable solution designed to maximise the value from waste and the intent is that the Project will therefore become an integral part of the local community. The Consortium will be fully committed to playing its part in supporting the local community.
As an example of this, the facilities will include a state of the art Visitor Centre which will not only be made available to the local community but which will add to the local tourist/visitor offering, attracting an estimated 3,000 visitors per annum. It will also act as a useful resource for local schools and colleges to support their learning programme.

No. The proposed plant will not emit smoke, with any visible plume being colourless steam which will be invisible, except in very cold and dry weather conditions when some condensation vapour may be visible. All emissions from the facility will be tightly controlled and monitored 24 hours a day, and will go through a state of the art cleaning process to ensure there is no unacceptable impact on the environment or air quality. A detailed Air Quality Impact Assessment is being submitted as part of the planning application which will outline all air quality considerations.

The average coal-fired power station will annually emit over 100 times more sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides than a typical EfW plant. Compared to coal or oil-fired power stations, EfWs emit less fossil CO₂. EfW facilities actually help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting waste away from landfill, and have a significantly more positive effect on climate protection.

Before a planning application is submitted, the Becon Consortium intends to carry out an extensive pre-application consultation programme on the proposals. This will include:

Feedback facilities for the local community will be made available via newsletters and Drop In exhibition events to allow people to provide their comments on the proposals. There will also be an online feedback facility on the website. We are keen to hear your views and feedback as these will inform our final planning application.

Later in the process, the consortium will hold an Open Day for local businesses so they can meet the Project Team and discuss potential opportunities for working on the development.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020 under the EU Landfill Directive. If we don’t meet these targets we could face heavy financial penalties for non-compliance.

Locating the facilities in the arc21 area is entirely consistent with the proximity and self-sufficiency principles outlined in European Waste Management Law. The proximity principle advocates that waste should be disposed of (or otherwise managed) close to the point at which it is generated, thus aiming to achieve responsible self-sufficiency within a region. The Becon project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

The proposed facilities will help the 11 Councils to not only meet their EU landfill reduction targets, therefore avoiding potential fines, but will also help increase overall recycling levels within the arc21 area by up to 10%. The project will also export 14MW electricity to the National Grid, enough to power more than 30,000 homes, contributing to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets, while significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to using landfill.

We must reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and become more self-sufficient in terms of energy generation. This is crucial if we are to prosper economically, attract new investment and create jobs for future generations. This project will also contribute to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy target and greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020 under the EU Landfill Directive. If we don’t meet these targets we could face heavy financial penalties for non-compliance.

Locating the facilities in the arc21 area is entirely consistent with the proximity and self-sufficiency principles outlined in European Waste Management Law. The proximity principle advocates that waste should be disposed of (or otherwise managed) close to the point at which it is generated, thus aiming to achieve responsible self-sufficiency within a region. The Becon project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

The proposed facilities will help the 6 Councils to not only meet their EU landfill reduction targets, therefore avoiding potential fines, but will also help increase overall recycling levels within the arc21 area by up to 10%. The project will also export 14MW electricity to the National Grid, enough to power more than 30,000 homes, contributing to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets, while significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to using landfill.

We must reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and become more self-sufficient in terms of energy generation. This is crucial if we are to prosper economically, attract new investment and create jobs for future generations. This project will also contribute to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy target and greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Before a planning application is submitted, the Becon Consortium intends to carry out an extensive pre-application consultation programme on the proposals. This will include:

Feedback facilities for the local community will be made available via newsletters and Drop In exhibition events to allow people to provide their comments on the proposals. There will also be an online feedback facility on the website. We are keen to hear your views and feedback as these will inform our final planning application.

Later in the process, the consortium will hold an Open Day for local businesses so they can meet the Project Team and discuss potential opportunities for working on the development.

No. The proposed plant will not emit smoke, with any visible plume being colourless steam which will be invisible, except in very cold and dry weather conditions when some condensation vapour may be visible. All emissions from the facility will be tightly controlled and monitored 24 hours a day, and will go through a state of the art cleaning process to ensure there is no unacceptable impact on the environment or air quality. A detailed Air Quality Impact Assessment is being submitted as part of the planning application which will outline all air quality considerations.

The average coal-fired power station will annually emit over 100 times more sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides than a typical EfW plant. Compared to coal or oil-fired power stations, EfWs emit less fossil CO₂. EfW facilities actually help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting waste away from landfill, and have a significantly more positive effect on climate protection.

Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities are among the most tightly regulated industrial processes. Dioxins are a family of chemicals which are present in the environment and are a natural by-product of any combustion process. A modern EfW facility will take 100 years of constant operation to produce more dioxins than that emitted during 15 minutes worth of fireworks in London to celebrate the millennium.

The plants will help Northern Ireland to meet its landfill reduction targets and recycling targets, as well as contributing to our greenhouse gas reduction targets and renewable energy targets through producing sustainable energy.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020. This project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

At the same time, recycling will continue to be a major focus with an NI target of 60% for household recycling by 2020 currently under consideration. This project will increase arc21’s constituent Councils’ overall recycling rates by up to 10% through the extraction of plastics, metals, aggregates and other valuable materials.

We also have targets to produce a minimum of 40% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% based on 1990 levels by 2025. Using all our waste efficiently and effectively and treating it as a valuable resource will help meet these targets.
The Becon Project will contribute over 50,000 MWh per year to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets and reduce C0₂ Equivalent greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 tonnes per year relative to sending waste to landfill.

The plants will help Northern Ireland to meet its landfill reduction targets and recycling targets, as well as contributing to our greenhouse gas reduction targets and renewable energy targets through producing sustainable energy.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020. This project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

At the same time, recycling will continue to be a major focus with an NI target of 60% for household recycling by 2020 currently under consideration. This project will increase arc21’s constituent Councils’ overall recycling rates by up to 10% through the extraction of plastics, metals, aggregates and other valuable materials.

We also have targets to produce a minimum of 40% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% based on 1990 levels by 2025. Using all our waste efficiently and effectively and treating it as a valuable resource will help meet these targets. The Becon Project will contribute over 50,000 MWh per year to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets and reduce C0₂ Equivalent greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 tonnes per year relative to sending waste to landfill.

House prices are influenced by a wide variety of factors, the most important of those over recent times being a depressed economic climate.
While we fully appreciate that some people may have concerns about the potential impact of our project on house prices in the area, our experience tells us that these fears are often based on a lack of knowledge and understanding about the tried and tested technology that we are proposing. With over 20 years’ experience of delivering and operating 19 similar facilities across Europe we are not aware of any evidence that the development or presence of well managed waste facilities such as those we are proposing has any measurable or lasting impact on house prices or the saleability of homes in nearby areas. In fact some evidence suggests that in many cases their presence gives a benefit to the local community in terms of local investment and jobs and providing affordable district heating systems and electricity.
Our experience also tells us however that where there is a lack of understanding about these types of facilities that it is vitally important to share as much information with people to allow them to become more familiar with the proposals and the technologies, therefore addressing their concerns.
There have been a number of independent studies carried out across the UK and Ireland which have assessed the potential impact of similar facilities on house prices, and which draw on European experience. You may find them useful if you have any concerns about the potential impact on property prices in the area.
One UK study suggests that energy from waste plants/incinerators do not lead to decreased property values. Research in Hampshire, before and after the construction of three incinerators in the last seven years, found that there was “no noticeable or lasting adverse effect on the property markets in those locations due to the presence of the incinerators”. You can find the report here

In all three locations values have continued to rise in line with other areas in their local markets. In addition there has been substantial investment/development in both the residential and commercial sectors in the areas around the plants in the periods following grant of planning consent and construction. This has continued once the plants have become operational”. Cluttons Surveyors

Independent research was also carried out into the potential impact of the Poolbeg Thermal Treatment Plant in Dublin on local property values. This study also focused on available evidence elsewhere across Europe where these facilities exist in many urban area near local housing.
The research carried out indicated that ‘there appears to be have been no impact on house prices or the volume of properties being offered for sale in the vicinity of Poolbeg since it was announced in 2001.’ The full report can be found at http://www.dublinwastetoenergy.ie/uploads/archive/files/briefs-of-evidence/marie-hunt.pdf

Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities are among the most tightly regulated industrial processes. Dioxins are a family of chemicals which are present in the environment and are a natural by-product of any combustion process. A modern EfW facility will take 100 years of constant operation to produce more dioxins than that emitted during 15 minutes worth of fireworks in London to celebrate the millennium.

In addition to the Environmental Impact Assessment set to protect the environment and health, a voluntary Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been commissioned to draw from and build upon the regulatory assessment to further investigate and address local community concerns. The scope and focus of the HIA has been discussed with the Public Health Agency and Environmental Health Officers, and will be further refined through the issues and opportunities raised by local communities through the comprehensive consultation exercise.

The final HIA will apply the current scientific evidence base to test the UK Health Protection Agency’s position, that modern, well run facilities present a negligible impact on local air quality and no measurable risk to health.

A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant is a type of waste processing facility that combines an automated mechanical pre-sorting facility and a form of biological treatment.

The mechanical treatment component of the plant typically resembles a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and separates different materials to allow for efficient management of the waste. The biological treatment can include composting, bio-drying or anaerobic digestion. The type of waste treatment being proposed in the MBT plant is widely used in Great Britain and Europe. A recent study on MBT plants in Europe suggests that there are more than 330 plants currently in operation with a capacity to treat up to 33 million tonnes annually.

A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant is a type of waste processing facility that combines an automated mechanical pre-sorting facility and a form of biological treatment.

The mechanical treatment component of the plant typically resembles a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and separates different materials to allow for efficient management of the waste. The biological treatment can include composting, bio-drying or anaerobic digestion. The type of waste treatment being proposed in the MBT plant is widely used in Great Britain and Europe. A recent study on MBT plants in Europe suggests that there are more than 330 plants currently in operation with a capacity to treat up to 33 million tonnes annually.

In addition to the Environmental Impact Assessment set to protect the environment and health, a voluntary Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been commissioned to draw from and build upon the regulatory assessment to further investigate and address local community concerns. The scope and focus of the HIA has been discussed with the Public Health Agency and Environmental Health Officers, and will be further refined through the issues and opportunities raised by local communities through the comprehensive consultation exercise.

The final HIA will apply the current scientific evidence base to test the UK Health Protection Agency’s position, that modern, well run facilities present a negligible impact on local air quality and no measurable risk to health.

Much of the traffic that will be going to the site is currently already in the local area going to landfill.
Subject to final approval, vehicles are expected to travel to the facility between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. Vehicles travelling to the facility will be fully covered and cleaned regularly. There is a wheel wash system located next to the exit which will be used by all outgoing vehicles.

Detailed traffic studies and planning has indicated that on average there will be a total of 199 vehicles arriving and 199 vehicles departing the site per day. The vehicle mix is made up of 118 HGV movements and 81 car movements.
The average flow will total 11 vehicles arriving (7 HGV trips & 4 car trips) and 11 vehicles departing (7 HGV trips & 4 car trips) per hour when the site is operational.

Energy from Waste (EfW) technology involves the thermal treatment of waste to release energy that is then used to generate steam and electricity. Thermal waste treatment is a tried and tested technology that ensures the safe and environmentally responsible treatment of waste. EfW plants have operated throughout continental Europe for decades, with over 450 plants in operation today. Many of these are located in countries with long established ‘green’ credentials such as the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany alone, some 24 million tonnes of waste a year are processed in EfW plants. In Great Britain, there are currently 36 EfW plants consented or in operation.

The proposed EfW plant will incorporate the latest emissions technologies used successfully across Continental Europe. Employing EfW technology is compatible with high levels of recycling, evident in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. These countries use EfW extensively yet have combined recycling and composting rates of over 50%.

Energy from Waste (EfW) technology involves the thermal treatment of waste to release energy that is then used to generate steam and electricity. Thermal waste treatment is a tried and tested technology that ensures the safe and environmentally responsible treatment of waste. EfW plants have operated throughout continental Europe for decades, with over 450 plants in operation today. Many of these are located in countries with long established ‘green’ credentials such as the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany alone, some 24 million tonnes of waste a year are processed in EfW plants. In Great Britain, there are currently 36 EfW plants consented or in operation.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process and will incorporate the latest emissions technologies used successfully across Continental Europe. Employing EfW technology is compatible with high levels of recycling, evident in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. These countries use EfW extensively yet have combined recycling and composting rates of over 50%.

Much of the traffic that will be going to the site is currently already in the local area going to landfill.
Subject to final approval, vehicles are expected to travel to the facility between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. Vehicles travelling to the facility will be fully covered and cleaned regularly. There is a wheel wash system located next to the exit which will be used by all outgoing vehicles.

Detailed traffic studies and planning has indicated that on average there will be a total of 224 vehicles arriving and 224 vehicles departing the site per day. The vehicle mix is made up of 143 HGV movements and 81 car movements.
The average vehicle flow will total 20 vehicles arriving (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) and 20 vehicles departing (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) when the site is operational.

The average daily numbers of HGV vehicle movements to the site over the ten year period of quarrying activity between 1999 and 2008 was 89 one-way (in-bound) trips. The net change in the number of HGV daily trips anticipated with the proposed development is extremely modest with some 118 HGVs anticipated on a daily basis.

In heat energy terms the EfW has an annual capacity of 68MWTHERMAL. The facility will be able to export approximately 14MWELECTRIC of electricity to the grid, which will provide over 100,000 MWh per year, enough electricity to power over 30,000 homes.

The heat produced in the EfW will be used primarily to generate electricity but will also be used to supply a number of heat requirements on the site such as the MBT biological treatment and other onsite facilities. Up to 10MWTH of heat, in addition to electricity export, could be available for potential heat off-take which can be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

In heat energy terms the EfW has an annual capacity of 68MWTHERMAL. The facility will be able to export approximately 14MWELECTRIC of electricity to the grid, which will provide over 100,000 MWh per year, enough electricity to power over 30,000 homes.

The heat produced in the EfW will be used primarily to generate electricity but will also be used to supply a number of heat requirements on the site such as the MBT biological treatment and other onsite facilities. Up to 10MWTH of heat, in addition to electricity export, could be available for potential heat off-take which can be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

The average daily numbers of HGV vehicle movements to the site over the ten year period of quarrying activity between 1999 and 2008 was 89 one-way (in-bound) trips. The net change in the number of HGV daily trips anticipated with the proposed development is extremely modest with some 118 HGVs anticipated on a daily basis.

Significant infrastructural improvements will include widening of the Boghill Road along a 1.2km stretch from the junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Rd to the access road to the site. The road will be widened to a 6.7m carriageway with a 2m footpath on its northern side – a substantial improvement from its current condition, which at its narrowest is only 4m wide. The junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Road will also be enhanced to improve sightlines.

There are a number of benefits in co-locating the two facilities on the same site:


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There are a number of benefits in co-locating the two facilities on the same site in Hightown Quarry, Mallusk:

Our Traffic Assessment shows that operational traffic (HGV and cars) for the proposed Becon site is largely concentrated on accessing and using the motorway network and will involve the diversion of much of the waste traffic currently making its way to Cottonmount Landfill (where nine of the 11 Councils residual waste is currently going) to the Hightown Quarry site.
It is anticipated that over 82% of site vehicles (HGVs and cars) will access the site from the Sandyknowles/ M2 junction with over 67% originating from the M2 itself. On entering the Mallusk area we are proposing that this traffic will turn left towards the Hightown Road and then turn right onto the Hightown Road. At the top of the Hightown Road it will turn right onto HydePark Road and then immediate left on the Boghill Road, where it will make its way to the site.
It is anticipated that around 17.5 % of the vehicles will continue to use the Mallusk Road and then follow the same route above to access the Boghill Road site entrance.

This will depend on exactly where you live, but the appearance of the proposed plants will be an important factor in their design to minimise impact on the local area. A detailed Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment has been prepared as part of the Environmental Statement and is available to view on the website in the Downloads section.

The EfW will be housed in a purpose-designed modern, streamlined building. The intention of the design is to use the tiered quarry platforms of the site to minimise the visual impact of the development. The topography of the quarry site means that many of the buildings on the site will not be visible from various locations. The new enclosed facilities will be in keeping with the surrounding area and a landscaping and planting programme will be undertaken to minimise visual impact further and to increase the diversity of local wildlife habitats.

The higher EfW building and flue will be seen in longer views although rendered photomontages demonstrate that this impact will be relatively modest. The proposed EfW facility will include a stack which will be 80 metres in height. The height of the stack is determined by the need to be elevated above the quarry face for dispersal of steam emissions.

Up to 90% of the waste delivered to the site is expected to be municipal residual waste (black bin waste) from the 11 arc21 councils. The remaining waste, which will be used to fill the EfW to capacity to maximise efficiency and electricity generation, will be commercial and industrial waste sourced from a third party.

Up to 90% of the waste delivered to the site is expected to be municipal residual waste (black bin waste) from the 6 arc21 councils. The remaining waste, which will be used to fill the EfW to capacity to maximise efficiency and electricity generation, will be commercial and industrial waste sourced from a third party.

Historically, quarry operations at Hightown have at times also generated substantially more HGV traffic than the proposed development. Given the unrestricted nature of the quarry planning permission, the potential to generate high volumes of quarry traffic at any time of the day still remains and with little prospect of road improvements or controls in place.
With this project however, a number of important road improvements will me made and controls put in place to ensure the timing of waste deliveries will be restricted to between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. The routes used will also be clearly agreed and communicated with the drivers of all vehicles accessing and exiting the Hightown site. These routes will be tightly monitored and controlled, with route direction signs located at appropriate points to direct vehicles onto the specified routes to be used. Where persistent breaches of Becon’s instructions are recorded the offending drivers will receive a verbal warning and if the breaches continue the driver will be suspended from accessing the site and where appropriate the driver’s employer will be advised of the suspension.

MBT building – 14 m
EFW building – 52 m
EFW Stack – 80 m

The site has been designed to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste in any given year, which will be split between the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility (capacity 300,000 tonnes) and the Energy from Waste (EfW) facility (capacity 68MWTH). For the year 2019/20, based on the assumed waste composition and projected waste tonnages the MBT is expected to accept and treat 241,319 tonnes of arc21 Municipal Waste and the EfW is expected to thermally treat 211,000 tonnes of fuel generated in the MBT and Third Party Waste.

The site has been designed to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste in any given year, which will be split between the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility (capacity 300,000 tonnes) and the Energy from Waste (EfW) facility (capacity 68MWTH). For the year 2019/20, based on the assumed waste composition and projected waste tonnages the MBT is expected to accept and treat 241,319 tonnes of arc21 Municipal Waste and the EfW is expected to thermally treat 211,000 tonnes of fuel generated in the MBT and Third Party Waste.

Significant infrastructural improvements will include widening of the Boghill Road along a 1.2km stretch from the junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Rd to the access road to the site. The road will be widened to a 6.7m carriageway with a 2m footpath on its northern side – a substantial improvement from its current condition, which at its narrowest is only 4m wide. The junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Road will also be enhanced to improve sightlines.

Yes, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing the region’s waste. The Becon Consortium will work with arc21 to encourage people to minimise waste and to increase reuse and recycling. However, not all waste can be dealt with in this way and the proposed facilities are urgently needed to reduce the amount of residual waste – the waste that cannot be recycled – being sent to landfill.

Yes, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing the region’s waste. The Becon Consortium will work with arc21 to encourage people to minimise waste and to increase reuse and recycling. However, not all waste can be dealt with in this way and the proposed facilities are urgently needed to reduce the amount of residual waste – the waste that cannot be recycled – being sent to landfill.

This will depend on exactly where you live, but the appearance of the proposed plants will be an important factor in their design to minimise impact on the local area. A detailed Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment has been prepared as part of the Environmental Statement and is available to view on the website in the Downloads section.

The EfW will be housed in a purpose-designed modern, streamlined building. The intention of the design is to use the tiered quarry platforms of the site to minimise the visual impact of the development. The topography of the quarry site means that many of the buildings on the site will not be visible from various locations. The new enclosed facilities will be in keeping with the surrounding area and a landscaping and planting programme will be undertaken to minimise visual impact further and to increase the diversity of local wildlife habitats.

The higher EfW building and flue will be seen in longer views although rendered photomontages demonstrate that this impact will be relatively modest. The proposed EfW facility will include a stack which will be 80 metres in height. The height of the stack is determined by the need to be elevated above the quarry face for dispersal of steam emissions.

The proposed MBT will have the capacity to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste, however it is likely to treat approximately 245,000 tonnes per year. Materials such as metals, plastics and other recyclable products will be extracted from the waste at the mechanical treatment stage using automated separation equipment and manual hand picking. The organic rich material of the waste remaining after recyclate extraction will be treated in the Bio-drying Tunnels to reduce its mass and improve the combustion characteristics of the material. Following the MBT process, any material which cannot be recycled will be conveyed to the EfW plant as a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) for recovery. All stages of the MBT operations are undertaken in purpose-designed, fully enclosed buildings, thus preventing noise, dust and smells from escaping.

The proposed EfW plant will have a thermal capacity of 68MWTH and is expected to accept and treat approximately 211,000 tonnes of waste per annum. The Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) generated in the MBT will be conveyed directly to the EfW bunker where it will be mixed with commercial and industrial waste to produce a fuel. The heat produced from the combustion of the fuel will be used primarily to generate electricity of which approximately 14MW will be exported to the grid.

In addition to electricity export, up to 10MW of the heat produced in the EfW may also be used to supply potential ‘heat off-take’, which could be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

The proposed MBT will have the capacity to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste, however it is likely to treat approximately 245,000 tonnes per year. Materials such as metals, plastics and other recyclable products will be extracted from the waste at the mechanical treatment stage using automated separation equipment and manual hand picking. The organic rich material of the waste remaining after recyclate extraction will be treated in the Bio-drying Tunnels to reduce its mass and improve the combustion characteristics of the material. Following the MBT process, any material which cannot be recycled will be conveyed to the EfW plant as a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) for recovery. All stages of the MBT operations are undertaken in purpose-designed, fully enclosed buildings, thus preventing noise, dust and smells from escaping.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process with a thermal capacity of 68MWTH and is expected to accept and treat approximately 211,000 tonnes of waste per annum. The Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) generated in the MBT will be conveyed directly to the EfW bunker where it will be mixed with commercial and industrial waste to produce a fuel. The heat produced from the combustion of the fuel will be used primarily to generate electricity of which approximately 14MW will be exported to the grid.

In addition to electricity export, up to 10MW of the heat produced in the EfW may also be used to supply potential ‘heat off-take’, which could be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

MBT building – 14 m
EFW building – 52 m
EFW Stack – 80 m

The site will be operational 24 hours per day seven days a week however the majority of arc21 waste is expected to be delivered from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm Saturdays. On occasion it will be necessary to deliver waste to the site outside of these hours when requested by the Authority, and this will be by prior arrangement. All Third Party Waste deliveries will run concurrently with Authority Waste deliveries.

The site will be operational 24 hours per day seven days a week however the majority of arc21 waste is expected to be delivered from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm Saturdays. On occasion it will be necessary to deliver waste to the site outside of these hours when requested by the Authority, and this will be by prior arrangement. All Third Party Waste deliveries will run concurrently with Authority Waste deliveries.

Yes. The ash generated in the EfW will be processed on site to produce a material which can be used as an aggregate in the construction industry.

Yes. The ash generated in the EfW incineration process will be processed on site to produce a material which can be used as an aggregate in the construction industry.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The technology is proven, reliable and strictly regulated. To be allowed to operate, the EfW facility will require an Environmental Permit which is only issued if the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) is satisfied that people and the environment are protected.

Once operational the proposed plants will be regulated by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and will comply with the strict emission limits set under the Environmental Permit and the Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU). The emissions from the EfW will be constantly monitored to ensure that the plant always operates within the limits set out in the Environmental Permit.

The total investment in these facilities will be £240 million.

The Becon Consortium plans to build a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant, an Energy from Waste (EfW) plant and a Visitor Centre at the Hightown Quarry site on the Boghill Road, Mallusk. This will enable arc21, the umbrella waste body for 11 Councils in the East of Northern Ireland, meet European landfill diversion targets and manage its waste more sustainably.

This project represents a major investment for Northern Ireland – approximately £240 million in development and construction alone. In the construction of the new waste facilities, local contractors will be used wherever possible, thereby maximising opportunities for employment and benefiting the wider local economy. An independent economic assessment estimates it will support 337 permanent direct and indirect jobs when the plants are operational.

The project is subject to receiving planning permission and we are currently involved in the PAD process which encourages submission of draft planning application documentation for review by DoE Strategic Projects team and its consultees. We hope to submit the formal planning application by autumn 2013. We will continue to engage with DoE and its consultees to try and secure a planning decision as soon as possible.

The project is subject to receiving planning permission. The planning application was submitted in March 2014 and a notice of opinion was issued by the then Minister Of the Environment, Mark H Durkan to refuse planning in September 2015. His notice of opinion was contrary to that of his Departmental officials who recommended a notice to approve. The application has now been referred to the Planning Appeals Commission for an appeal hearing scheduled for October 2016. Ultimately it will be the Minister for the Department of Infrastructure who will determine planning.

The proposed site is situated at the Hightown Quarry premises on the Boghill Road, which is in the townland of Ballyutoag near Mallusk.

The exact site address is:
Hightown Quarry,
40a Boghill Road,
Ballyutoag,
Mallusk
Co. Antrim BT36 4QS

The Hightown site comprises over 60 hectares, although not all of this will be required for the construction of the plants and their associated facilities.

The technology is proven, reliable and strictly regulated. To be allowed to operate, the EfW facility will require an Environmental Permit which is only issued if the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) is satisfied that people and the environment are protected.

Once operational the proposed plants will be regulated by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and will comply with the strict emission limits set under the Environmental Permit and the Industrial Emissions Directive (Directive 2010/75/EU). The emissions from the EfW will be constantly monitored to ensure that the plant always operates within the limits set out in the Environmental Permit.

The total investment in these facilities will be £240 million.

The Becon Consortium plans to build a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant, an Energy from Waste (EfW) plant using an incinerator with energy recovery process and a Visitor Centre at the Hightown Quarry site on the Boghill Road, Mallusk. This will enable arc21, the umbrella waste body for 6 Councils in the East of Northern Ireland, meet European landfill diversion targets and manage its waste more sustainably.

This project represents a major investment for Northern Ireland – approximately £240 million in development and construction alone. In the construction of the new waste facilities, local contractors will be used wherever possible, thereby maximising opportunities for employment and benefiting the wider local economy. An independent economic assessment estimates it will support 337 permanent direct and indirect jobs when the plants are operational.

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Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

One of the permit requirements will be that there is no noticeable odour and frequent checks will be carried out to ensure this is strictly enforced. A number of measures will be employed to ensure that odours are contained within the facilities, including ventilation, negative air pressure and bio-filter systems. All waste will be handled inside fully contained buildings and all vehicles bringing waste to site will be covered to prevent odours escaping.

Over the 41 month construction phase it is estimated that 2,701 direct job years of employment will be created or sustained of which 2,220 job years will directly relate to construction activities. At the peak of the construction activities it is estimated that upwards of 455 construction workers will be engaged on the site.

Once fully operational it is estimated that 94 full time permanent jobs will be created at the new waste processing facilities at the Hightown Quarry site. An additional 243 indirect and / or induced jobs will also be created or sustained in the wider Northern Ireland economy as a result of the on-going operations at the Hightown Quarry site.

arc21 is the umbrella waste management group for 11 councils in the east of Northern Ireland and is the procuring authority for this project. The proposed infrastructure will complement existing recycling and composting facilities in Northern Ireland which process material collected by the arc21 councils.

At present, arc21’s region accounts for 54% of all Northern Ireland’s municipal waste – 518,000 tonnes for the year to March 2012. Household recycling rates have jumped to over 39% from just 7.5% in 2000. arc21’s aim is to continue to improve recycling rates.

The technology proposed is part of the overarching solution to radically improve waste management in the arc21 area and is identified as part of the preferred mix of treatment solutions set out in the arc21 Waste Management Plan.

The development of these facilities is subject to the completion of the ongoing arc21 procurement process, securing planning permission and the attainment of various regulatory permits.

The project is subject to planning permission, so it is difficult to say at this stage when construction will commence. What we can say is that from receipt of planning permission we would aim to have the site constructed and in full operation within four years.

Commercial quarrying operations have been carried out at the site since 1965 with current operations being undertaken with the benefit of planning permission secured in July 1996. Although full-time production ceased in 2008 there has been intermittent working since that date to serve individual contracts. This contract based working continues on site and the quarry remains in a position to commence full time production in response to market demand.

The project is subject to planning permission, so it is difficult to say at this stage when construction will commence. What we can say is that from receipt of planning permission we would aim to have the site constructed and in full operation within four years.

arc21 is the umbrella waste management group for 6 councils in the east of Northern Ireland and is the procuring authority for this project. The proposed infrastructure will complement existing recycling and composting facilities in Northern Ireland which process material collected by the arc21 councils.

At present, arc21’s region accounts for 55% of all Northern Ireland’s municipal waste – 508,426 tonnes for the year to March 2015. Household recycling rates have jumped to over 41.5% from just 7.5% in 2000. arc21’s aim is to continue to improve recycling rates.

The technology proposed is part of the overarching solution to radically improve waste management in the arc21 area and is identified as part of the preferred mix of treatment solutions set out in the arc21 Waste Management Plan.

The development of these facilities is subject to the completion of the ongoing arc21 procurement process, securing planning permission and the attainment of various regulatory permits.

One of the permit requirements will be that there is no noticeable odour and frequent checks will be carried out to ensure this is strictly enforced. A number of measures will be employed to ensure that odours are contained within the facilities, including ventilation, negative air pressure and bio-filter systems. All waste will be handled inside fully contained buildings and all vehicles bringing waste to site will be covered to prevent odours escaping.

Over the 41 month construction phase it is estimated that 2,701 direct job years of employment will be created or sustained of which 2,220 job years will directly relate to construction activities. At the peak of the construction activities it is estimated that upwards of 455 construction workers will be engaged on the site.

Once fully operational it is estimated that 94 full time permanent jobs will be created at the new waste processing facilities at the Hightown Quarry site. An additional 243 indirect and / or induced jobs will also be created or sustained in the wider Northern Ireland economy as a result of the on-going operations at the Hightown Quarry site.

The Consortium was free to choose a suitable site anywhere in the arc21 region, either from a list of available sites provided by arc21 or using its own alternative.

Following a comprehensive site selection process the Hightown quarry site was chosen because:

The design of the facility will minimise noise impacts and any equipment with the potential to be noisy will be located within acoustically insulated buildings.

A noise impact assessment has been undertaken as part of the Environmental Statement and demonstrates that the site will operate to satisfactory levels. The removal of blasting, crushing and quarrying activity will improve the baseline noise levels on the site.

The scale of the project marks it out as one of regional significance and as such its planning will be managed by the Department of the Environment (DoE) Planning’s ‘Strategic Projects’ team. Major projects are known as ‘Article 31’ projects as they trigger that part of the Planning Order. The Department identifies those applications that are to be treated as major and its decision on an Article 31 application is final.

Having considered the application, including representations from the public, the Department may decide to request the Planning Appeals Commission (PAC) to hold a local public inquiry. Alternatively, the Department may serve a notice on the applicant indicating the decision which it proposes to make (referred to as a Notice of Opinion). This can be a Notice of Opinion to Approve or Refuse. The applicant may request a hearing before the Commission within the period specified in the Notice of Opinion.

The PAC is an independent body which, at the request of the DoE conducts Inquiries or Hearings to consider major planning applications.

This project delivers a necessary solution for waste management within the overall arc21 area which will divert residual waste (the remaining waste which can’t be recycled or reused) from landfill. This will help NI achieve its environmental obligations on waste management and in the process help avoid landfill tax and potential fines from EU for failing to meet our targets.

This project will also bring investment into Northern Ireland at a time when it is much needed. The local area will benefit from 455 construction jobs at the peak of the on-site construction activities and create/sustain approximately 340 direct and indirect jobs annually during operation. Wherever possible the suppliers and sub-contractors under consideration for contract awards will be drawn from the locality of the Hightown Quarry site in the first instance and Northern Ireland in general in accordance with the Project’s commitment to equality and sustainable development. There will also be opportunities for young people from the local area to take part in apprentice training schemes.

The Consortium aims to source substantial quantities of construction materials such as concrete, steel and metal cladding from local suppliers. 25% of the materials required for the EfW plant will be sourced locally, and 50% of the materials required for the construction of the MBT plant.
The Consortium proposes to deliver a long-term sustainable solution designed to maximise the value from waste and the intent is that the Project will therefore become an integral part of the local community. The Consortium will be fully committed to playing its part in supporting the local community. As an example of this, the facilities will include a state of the art Visitor Centre which will not only be made available to the local community but which will add to the local tourist/visitor offering, attracting an estimated 3,000 visitors per annum. It will also act as a useful resource for local schools and colleges to support their learning programme.

The driving force behind the Becon Consortium is E.ON Energy from Waste (EEW) which develops, builds, finances and operates EfW plants throughout Europe and has a proven track record of integrity, reliability and environmental performance. The company is currently owned by the E.ON Group. However, agreement has been reached on the sale of EEW to a joint venture comprising the EQT Fund and E.ON SE. This is subject to final approval by the EU Antitrust Authority which is anticipated in the first half of 2013. EQT is a group of leading private equity funds with investments in Northern and Eastern Europe, Asia and the US. The group’s activities focus on infrastructure, growth financing and buyouts.

Directly, or through subsidiaries and associated companies, EEW currently owns and operates 19 EfW facilities, including plants in Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The company’s plants handle approximately five million tonnes of municipal and industrial waste each year and generate up to 2,900GWh of steam/heat and up to 2,800GWh of electricity.

For further details visit www.eon-energyfromwaste.com

The Consortium was free to choose a suitable site anywhere in the arc21 region, either from a list of available sites provided by arc21 or using its own alternative.

Following a comprehensive site selection process the Hightown quarry site, Mallusk was chosen because:

The scale of the project marks it out as one of regional significance and as such its planning will be managed by the Department of the Environment (DoE) Planning’s ‘Strategic Projects’ team. Major projects are known as ‘Article 31’ projects as they trigger that part of the Planning Order. The Department identifies those applications that are to be treated as major and its decision on an Article 31 application is final.

Having considered the application, including representations from the public, the Departmental Minister serves a notice on the applicant indicating the decision which it proposes to make (referred to as a Notice of Opinion). This can be a Notice of Opinion to Approve or Refuse. In this instance the then Minister issued a Notice of Opinion to refuse in September 2015 (which was contrary to the recommendation of his departmental officials)

The applicant has subsequently requested an Appeal Hearing in front of the Planning Appeals Commission (PAC). The PAC is an independent body which, at the request of the DoE conducts Inquiries or Hearings to consider major planning applications.

The Hearing will be held in October 2016 with a report then being forward to the Department and a final decision by the Minister for Infrastructure.

The Becon Consortium was formed to pursue the opportunity created by arc21’s public procurement for its residual waste treatment project. The location and design of the proposals developed by the Becon Consortium in respect of the project and key milestones are set out on this website.

The company behind the Becon Consortium is Indaver (NI) Ltd (previously known as EEW Energy from Waste UK Limited). During the latter part of 2015 and the early part of 2016, Indaver (NI) Ltd was acquired from EEW Energy from Waste GmBH by Indaver N.V.

Indaver N.V. has for over 25 years been providing integrated waste management services to public authorities. These partnerships deliver services which include: the treatment of municipal waste; the organisation of waste management systems and the development and management of specialised waste treatment facilities.

In 2011 Indaver completed the construction of the first municipal Energy from Waste plant on the island of Ireland. The plant located at Duleek, Co. Meath provides a thermal treatment and recovery solution for 230,000 tonnes of household and commercial waste annually while generating renewable electricity to power 20,000 homes. Each year, across 6 European countries, Indaver manages more than 5 million tonnes of waste, the majority of which is either recovered as energy or recycled.

For further details visit www.indaver.com

The design of the facility will minimise noise impacts and any equipment with the potential to be noisy will be located within acoustically insulated buildings.

A noise impact assessment has been undertaken as part of the Environmental Statement and demonstrates that the site will operate to satisfactory levels. The removal of blasting, crushing and quarrying activity will improve the baseline noise levels

This project delivers a necessary solution for waste management within the overall arc21 area which will divert residual waste (the remaining waste which can’t be recycled or reused) from landfill. This will help NI achieve its environmental obligations on waste management and in the process help avoid landfill tax and potential fines from EU for failing to meet our targets.

This project will also bring investment into Northern Ireland at a time when it is much needed. The local area will benefit from 455 construction jobs at the peak of the on-site construction activities and create/sustain approximately 340 direct and indirect jobs annually during operation. Wherever possible the suppliers and sub-contractors under consideration for contract awards will be drawn from the locality of the Hightown Quarry site in the first instance and Northern Ireland in general in accordance with the Project’s commitment to equality and sustainable development. There will also be opportunities for young people from the local area to take part in apprentice training schemes.

The Consortium aims to source substantial quantities of construction materials such as concrete, steel and metal cladding from local suppliers. 25% of the materials required for the EfW plant will be sourced locally, and 50% of the materials required for the construction of the MBT plant.

The Consortium proposes to deliver a long-term sustainable solution designed to maximise the value from waste and the intent is that the Project will therefore become an integral part of the local community. The Consortium will be fully committed to playing its part in supporting the local community.
As an example of this, the facilities will include a state of the art Visitor Centre which will not only be made available to the local community but which will add to the local tourist/visitor offering, attracting an estimated 3,000 visitors per annum. It will also act as a useful resource for local schools and colleges to support their learning programme.

No. The proposed plant will not emit smoke, with any visible plume being colourless steam which will be invisible, except in very cold and dry weather conditions when some condensation vapour may be visible. All emissions from the facility will be tightly controlled and monitored 24 hours a day, and will go through a state of the art cleaning process to ensure there is no unacceptable impact on the environment or air quality. A detailed Air Quality Impact Assessment is being submitted as part of the planning application which will outline all air quality considerations.

The average coal-fired power station will annually emit over 100 times more sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides than a typical EfW plant. Compared to coal or oil-fired power stations, EfWs emit less fossil CO₂. EfW facilities actually help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting waste away from landfill, and have a significantly more positive effect on climate protection.

Before a planning application is submitted, the Becon Consortium intends to carry out an extensive pre-application consultation programme on the proposals. This will include:

Feedback facilities for the local community will be made available via newsletters and Drop In exhibition events to allow people to provide their comments on the proposals. There will also be an online feedback facility on the website. We are keen to hear your views and feedback as these will inform our final planning application.

Later in the process, the consortium will hold an Open Day for local businesses so they can meet the Project Team and discuss potential opportunities for working on the development.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020 under the EU Landfill Directive. If we don’t meet these targets we could face heavy financial penalties for non-compliance.

Locating the facilities in the arc21 area is entirely consistent with the proximity and self-sufficiency principles outlined in European Waste Management Law. The proximity principle advocates that waste should be disposed of (or otherwise managed) close to the point at which it is generated, thus aiming to achieve responsible self-sufficiency within a region. The Becon project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

The proposed facilities will help the 11 Councils to not only meet their EU landfill reduction targets, therefore avoiding potential fines, but will also help increase overall recycling levels within the arc21 area by up to 10%. The project will also export 14MW electricity to the National Grid, enough to power more than 30,000 homes, contributing to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets, while significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to using landfill.

We must reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and become more self-sufficient in terms of energy generation. This is crucial if we are to prosper economically, attract new investment and create jobs for future generations. This project will also contribute to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy target and greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020 under the EU Landfill Directive. If we don’t meet these targets we could face heavy financial penalties for non-compliance.

Locating the facilities in the arc21 area is entirely consistent with the proximity and self-sufficiency principles outlined in European Waste Management Law. The proximity principle advocates that waste should be disposed of (or otherwise managed) close to the point at which it is generated, thus aiming to achieve responsible self-sufficiency within a region. The Becon project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

The proposed facilities will help the 6 Councils to not only meet their EU landfill reduction targets, therefore avoiding potential fines, but will also help increase overall recycling levels within the arc21 area by up to 10%. The project will also export 14MW electricity to the National Grid, enough to power more than 30,000 homes, contributing to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets, while significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions compared to using landfill.

We must reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and become more self-sufficient in terms of energy generation. This is crucial if we are to prosper economically, attract new investment and create jobs for future generations. This project will also contribute to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy target and greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Before a planning application is submitted, the Becon Consortium intends to carry out an extensive pre-application consultation programme on the proposals. This will include:

Feedback facilities for the local community will be made available via newsletters and Drop In exhibition events to allow people to provide their comments on the proposals. There will also be an online feedback facility on the website. We are keen to hear your views and feedback as these will inform our final planning application.

Later in the process, the consortium will hold an Open Day for local businesses so they can meet the Project Team and discuss potential opportunities for working on the development.

No. The proposed plant will not emit smoke, with any visible plume being colourless steam which will be invisible, except in very cold and dry weather conditions when some condensation vapour may be visible. All emissions from the facility will be tightly controlled and monitored 24 hours a day, and will go through a state of the art cleaning process to ensure there is no unacceptable impact on the environment or air quality. A detailed Air Quality Impact Assessment is being submitted as part of the planning application which will outline all air quality considerations.

The average coal-fired power station will annually emit over 100 times more sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides than a typical EfW plant. Compared to coal or oil-fired power stations, EfWs emit less fossil CO₂. EfW facilities actually help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting waste away from landfill, and have a significantly more positive effect on climate protection.

Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities are among the most tightly regulated industrial processes. Dioxins are a family of chemicals which are present in the environment and are a natural by-product of any combustion process. A modern EfW facility will take 100 years of constant operation to produce more dioxins than that emitted during 15 minutes worth of fireworks in London to celebrate the millennium.

The plants will help Northern Ireland to meet its landfill reduction targets and recycling targets, as well as contributing to our greenhouse gas reduction targets and renewable energy targets through producing sustainable energy.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020. This project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

At the same time, recycling will continue to be a major focus with an NI target of 60% for household recycling by 2020 currently under consideration. This project will increase arc21’s constituent Councils’ overall recycling rates by up to 10% through the extraction of plastics, metals, aggregates and other valuable materials.

We also have targets to produce a minimum of 40% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% based on 1990 levels by 2025. Using all our waste efficiently and effectively and treating it as a valuable resource will help meet these targets.
The Becon Project will contribute over 50,000 MWh per year to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets and reduce C0₂ Equivalent greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 tonnes per year relative to sending waste to landfill.

The plants will help Northern Ireland to meet its landfill reduction targets and recycling targets, as well as contributing to our greenhouse gas reduction targets and renewable energy targets through producing sustainable energy.

Northern Ireland is obliged to reduce waste going to landfill to 35% of 1995 levels by 2020. This project will divert up to 250,000 tonnes of municipal waste from landfill per year.

At the same time, recycling will continue to be a major focus with an NI target of 60% for household recycling by 2020 currently under consideration. This project will increase arc21’s constituent Councils’ overall recycling rates by up to 10% through the extraction of plastics, metals, aggregates and other valuable materials.

We also have targets to produce a minimum of 40% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% based on 1990 levels by 2025. Using all our waste efficiently and effectively and treating it as a valuable resource will help meet these targets. The Becon Project will contribute over 50,000 MWh per year to Northern Ireland’s renewable energy targets and reduce C0₂ Equivalent greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 tonnes per year relative to sending waste to landfill.

House prices are influenced by a wide variety of factors, the most important of those over recent times being a depressed economic climate.
While we fully appreciate that some people may have concerns about the potential impact of our project on house prices in the area, our experience tells us that these fears are often based on a lack of knowledge and understanding about the tried and tested technology that we are proposing. With over 20 years’ experience of delivering and operating 19 similar facilities across Europe we are not aware of any evidence that the development or presence of well managed waste facilities such as those we are proposing has any measurable or lasting impact on house prices or the saleability of homes in nearby areas. In fact some evidence suggests that in many cases their presence gives a benefit to the local community in terms of local investment and jobs and providing affordable district heating systems and electricity.
Our experience also tells us however that where there is a lack of understanding about these types of facilities that it is vitally important to share as much information with people to allow them to become more familiar with the proposals and the technologies, therefore addressing their concerns.
There have been a number of independent studies carried out across the UK and Ireland which have assessed the potential impact of similar facilities on house prices, and which draw on European experience. You may find them useful if you have any concerns about the potential impact on property prices in the area.
One UK study suggests that energy from waste plants/incinerators do not lead to decreased property values. Research in Hampshire, before and after the construction of three incinerators in the last seven years, found that there was “no noticeable or lasting adverse effect on the property markets in those locations due to the presence of the incinerators”. You can find the report here

In all three locations values have continued to rise in line with other areas in their local markets. In addition there has been substantial investment/development in both the residential and commercial sectors in the areas around the plants in the periods following grant of planning consent and construction. This has continued once the plants have become operational”. Cluttons Surveyors

Independent research was also carried out into the potential impact of the Poolbeg Thermal Treatment Plant in Dublin on local property values. This study also focused on available evidence elsewhere across Europe where these facilities exist in many urban area near local housing.
The research carried out indicated that ‘there appears to be have been no impact on house prices or the volume of properties being offered for sale in the vicinity of Poolbeg since it was announced in 2001.’ The full report can be found at http://www.dublinwastetoenergy.ie/uploads/archive/files/briefs-of-evidence/marie-hunt.pdf

Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities are among the most tightly regulated industrial processes. Dioxins are a family of chemicals which are present in the environment and are a natural by-product of any combustion process. A modern EfW facility will take 100 years of constant operation to produce more dioxins than that emitted during 15 minutes worth of fireworks in London to celebrate the millennium.

In addition to the Environmental Impact Assessment set to protect the environment and health, a voluntary Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been commissioned to draw from and build upon the regulatory assessment to further investigate and address local community concerns. The scope and focus of the HIA has been discussed with the Public Health Agency and Environmental Health Officers, and will be further refined through the issues and opportunities raised by local communities through the comprehensive consultation exercise.

The final HIA will apply the current scientific evidence base to test the UK Health Protection Agency’s position, that modern, well run facilities present a negligible impact on local air quality and no measurable risk to health.

A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant is a type of waste processing facility that combines an automated mechanical pre-sorting facility and a form of biological treatment.

The mechanical treatment component of the plant typically resembles a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and separates different materials to allow for efficient management of the waste. The biological treatment can include composting, bio-drying or anaerobic digestion. The type of waste treatment being proposed in the MBT plant is widely used in Great Britain and Europe. A recent study on MBT plants in Europe suggests that there are more than 330 plants currently in operation with a capacity to treat up to 33 million tonnes annually.

A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant is a type of waste processing facility that combines an automated mechanical pre-sorting facility and a form of biological treatment.

The mechanical treatment component of the plant typically resembles a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and separates different materials to allow for efficient management of the waste. The biological treatment can include composting, bio-drying or anaerobic digestion. The type of waste treatment being proposed in the MBT plant is widely used in Great Britain and Europe. A recent study on MBT plants in Europe suggests that there are more than 330 plants currently in operation with a capacity to treat up to 33 million tonnes annually.

In addition to the Environmental Impact Assessment set to protect the environment and health, a voluntary Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been commissioned to draw from and build upon the regulatory assessment to further investigate and address local community concerns. The scope and focus of the HIA has been discussed with the Public Health Agency and Environmental Health Officers, and will be further refined through the issues and opportunities raised by local communities through the comprehensive consultation exercise.

The final HIA will apply the current scientific evidence base to test the UK Health Protection Agency’s position, that modern, well run facilities present a negligible impact on local air quality and no measurable risk to health.

Much of the traffic that will be going to the site is currently already in the local area going to landfill.
Subject to final approval, vehicles are expected to travel to the facility between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. Vehicles travelling to the facility will be fully covered and cleaned regularly. There is a wheel wash system located next to the exit which will be used by all outgoing vehicles.

Detailed traffic studies and planning has indicated that on average there will be a total of 199 vehicles arriving and 199 vehicles departing the site per day. The vehicle mix is made up of 118 HGV movements and 81 car movements.
The average flow will total 11 vehicles arriving (7 HGV trips & 4 car trips) and 11 vehicles departing (7 HGV trips & 4 car trips) per hour when the site is operational.

Energy from Waste (EfW) technology involves the thermal treatment of waste to release energy that is then used to generate steam and electricity. Thermal waste treatment is a tried and tested technology that ensures the safe and environmentally responsible treatment of waste. EfW plants have operated throughout continental Europe for decades, with over 450 plants in operation today. Many of these are located in countries with long established ‘green’ credentials such as the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany alone, some 24 million tonnes of waste a year are processed in EfW plants. In Great Britain, there are currently 36 EfW plants consented or in operation.

The proposed EfW plant will incorporate the latest emissions technologies used successfully across Continental Europe. Employing EfW technology is compatible with high levels of recycling, evident in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. These countries use EfW extensively yet have combined recycling and composting rates of over 50%.

Energy from Waste (EfW) technology involves the thermal treatment of waste to release energy that is then used to generate steam and electricity. Thermal waste treatment is a tried and tested technology that ensures the safe and environmentally responsible treatment of waste. EfW plants have operated throughout continental Europe for decades, with over 450 plants in operation today. Many of these are located in countries with long established ‘green’ credentials such as the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany alone, some 24 million tonnes of waste a year are processed in EfW plants. In Great Britain, there are currently 36 EfW plants consented or in operation.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process and will incorporate the latest emissions technologies used successfully across Continental Europe. Employing EfW technology is compatible with high levels of recycling, evident in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. These countries use EfW extensively yet have combined recycling and composting rates of over 50%.

Much of the traffic that will be going to the site is currently already in the local area going to landfill.
Subject to final approval, vehicles are expected to travel to the facility between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. Vehicles travelling to the facility will be fully covered and cleaned regularly. There is a wheel wash system located next to the exit which will be used by all outgoing vehicles.

Detailed traffic studies and planning has indicated that on average there will be a total of 224 vehicles arriving and 224 vehicles departing the site per day. The vehicle mix is made up of 143 HGV movements and 81 car movements.
The average vehicle flow will total 20 vehicles arriving (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) and 20 vehicles departing (13 HGV trips & 7 car trips) when the site is operational.

The average daily numbers of HGV vehicle movements to the site over the ten year period of quarrying activity between 1999 and 2008 was 89 one-way (in-bound) trips. The net change in the number of HGV daily trips anticipated with the proposed development is extremely modest with some 118 HGVs anticipated on a daily basis.

In heat energy terms the EfW has an annual capacity of 68MWTHERMAL. The facility will be able to export approximately 14MWELECTRIC of electricity to the grid, which will provide over 100,000 MWh per year, enough electricity to power over 30,000 homes.

The heat produced in the EfW will be used primarily to generate electricity but will also be used to supply a number of heat requirements on the site such as the MBT biological treatment and other onsite facilities. Up to 10MWTH of heat, in addition to electricity export, could be available for potential heat off-take which can be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

In heat energy terms the EfW has an annual capacity of 68MWTHERMAL. The facility will be able to export approximately 14MWELECTRIC of electricity to the grid, which will provide over 100,000 MWh per year, enough electricity to power over 30,000 homes.

The heat produced in the EfW will be used primarily to generate electricity but will also be used to supply a number of heat requirements on the site such as the MBT biological treatment and other onsite facilities. Up to 10MWTH of heat, in addition to electricity export, could be available for potential heat off-take which can be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

The average daily numbers of HGV vehicle movements to the site over the ten year period of quarrying activity between 1999 and 2008 was 89 one-way (in-bound) trips. The net change in the number of HGV daily trips anticipated with the proposed development is extremely modest with some 118 HGVs anticipated on a daily basis.

Significant infrastructural improvements will include widening of the Boghill Road along a 1.2km stretch from the junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Rd to the access road to the site. The road will be widened to a 6.7m carriageway with a 2m footpath on its northern side – a substantial improvement from its current condition, which at its narrowest is only 4m wide. The junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Road will also be enhanced to improve sightlines.

There are a number of benefits in co-locating the two facilities on the same site:


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There are a number of benefits in co-locating the two facilities on the same site in Hightown Quarry, Mallusk:

Our Traffic Assessment shows that operational traffic (HGV and cars) for the proposed Becon site is largely concentrated on accessing and using the motorway network and will involve the diversion of much of the waste traffic currently making its way to Cottonmount Landfill (where nine of the 11 Councils residual waste is currently going) to the Hightown Quarry site.
It is anticipated that over 82% of site vehicles (HGVs and cars) will access the site from the Sandyknowles/ M2 junction with over 67% originating from the M2 itself. On entering the Mallusk area we are proposing that this traffic will turn left towards the Hightown Road and then turn right onto the Hightown Road. At the top of the Hightown Road it will turn right onto HydePark Road and then immediate left on the Boghill Road, where it will make its way to the site.
It is anticipated that around 17.5 % of the vehicles will continue to use the Mallusk Road and then follow the same route above to access the Boghill Road site entrance.

This will depend on exactly where you live, but the appearance of the proposed plants will be an important factor in their design to minimise impact on the local area. A detailed Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment has been prepared as part of the Environmental Statement and is available to view on the website in the Downloads section.

The EfW will be housed in a purpose-designed modern, streamlined building. The intention of the design is to use the tiered quarry platforms of the site to minimise the visual impact of the development. The topography of the quarry site means that many of the buildings on the site will not be visible from various locations. The new enclosed facilities will be in keeping with the surrounding area and a landscaping and planting programme will be undertaken to minimise visual impact further and to increase the diversity of local wildlife habitats.

The higher EfW building and flue will be seen in longer views although rendered photomontages demonstrate that this impact will be relatively modest. The proposed EfW facility will include a stack which will be 80 metres in height. The height of the stack is determined by the need to be elevated above the quarry face for dispersal of steam emissions.

Up to 90% of the waste delivered to the site is expected to be municipal residual waste (black bin waste) from the 11 arc21 councils. The remaining waste, which will be used to fill the EfW to capacity to maximise efficiency and electricity generation, will be commercial and industrial waste sourced from a third party.

Up to 90% of the waste delivered to the site is expected to be municipal residual waste (black bin waste) from the 6 arc21 councils. The remaining waste, which will be used to fill the EfW to capacity to maximise efficiency and electricity generation, will be commercial and industrial waste sourced from a third party.

Historically, quarry operations at Hightown have at times also generated substantially more HGV traffic than the proposed development. Given the unrestricted nature of the quarry planning permission, the potential to generate high volumes of quarry traffic at any time of the day still remains and with little prospect of road improvements or controls in place.
With this project however, a number of important road improvements will me made and controls put in place to ensure the timing of waste deliveries will be restricted to between the hours of 7am to 6pm from Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm on Saturday. The routes used will also be clearly agreed and communicated with the drivers of all vehicles accessing and exiting the Hightown site. These routes will be tightly monitored and controlled, with route direction signs located at appropriate points to direct vehicles onto the specified routes to be used. Where persistent breaches of Becon’s instructions are recorded the offending drivers will receive a verbal warning and if the breaches continue the driver will be suspended from accessing the site and where appropriate the driver’s employer will be advised of the suspension.

MBT building – 14 m
EFW building – 52 m
EFW Stack – 80 m

The site has been designed to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste in any given year, which will be split between the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility (capacity 300,000 tonnes) and the Energy from Waste (EfW) facility (capacity 68MWTH). For the year 2019/20, based on the assumed waste composition and projected waste tonnages the MBT is expected to accept and treat 241,319 tonnes of arc21 Municipal Waste and the EfW is expected to thermally treat 211,000 tonnes of fuel generated in the MBT and Third Party Waste.

The site has been designed to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste in any given year, which will be split between the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility (capacity 300,000 tonnes) and the Energy from Waste (EfW) facility (capacity 68MWTH). For the year 2019/20, based on the assumed waste composition and projected waste tonnages the MBT is expected to accept and treat 241,319 tonnes of arc21 Municipal Waste and the EfW is expected to thermally treat 211,000 tonnes of fuel generated in the MBT and Third Party Waste.

Significant infrastructural improvements will include widening of the Boghill Road along a 1.2km stretch from the junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Rd to the access road to the site. The road will be widened to a 6.7m carriageway with a 2m footpath on its northern side – a substantial improvement from its current condition, which at its narrowest is only 4m wide. The junction of Hydepark Road/Boghill Road will also be enhanced to improve sightlines.

Yes, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing the region’s waste. The Becon Consortium will work with arc21 to encourage people to minimise waste and to increase reuse and recycling. However, not all waste can be dealt with in this way and the proposed facilities are urgently needed to reduce the amount of residual waste – the waste that cannot be recycled – being sent to landfill.

Yes, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing the region’s waste. The Becon Consortium will work with arc21 to encourage people to minimise waste and to increase reuse and recycling. However, not all waste can be dealt with in this way and the proposed facilities are urgently needed to reduce the amount of residual waste – the waste that cannot be recycled – being sent to landfill.

This will depend on exactly where you live, but the appearance of the proposed plants will be an important factor in their design to minimise impact on the local area. A detailed Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment has been prepared as part of the Environmental Statement and is available to view on the website in the Downloads section.

The EfW will be housed in a purpose-designed modern, streamlined building. The intention of the design is to use the tiered quarry platforms of the site to minimise the visual impact of the development. The topography of the quarry site means that many of the buildings on the site will not be visible from various locations. The new enclosed facilities will be in keeping with the surrounding area and a landscaping and planting programme will be undertaken to minimise visual impact further and to increase the diversity of local wildlife habitats.

The higher EfW building and flue will be seen in longer views although rendered photomontages demonstrate that this impact will be relatively modest. The proposed EfW facility will include a stack which will be 80 metres in height. The height of the stack is determined by the need to be elevated above the quarry face for dispersal of steam emissions.

The proposed MBT will have the capacity to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste, however it is likely to treat approximately 245,000 tonnes per year. Materials such as metals, plastics and other recyclable products will be extracted from the waste at the mechanical treatment stage using automated separation equipment and manual hand picking. The organic rich material of the waste remaining after recyclate extraction will be treated in the Bio-drying Tunnels to reduce its mass and improve the combustion characteristics of the material. Following the MBT process, any material which cannot be recycled will be conveyed to the EfW plant as a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) for recovery. All stages of the MBT operations are undertaken in purpose-designed, fully enclosed buildings, thus preventing noise, dust and smells from escaping.

The proposed EfW plant will have a thermal capacity of 68MWTH and is expected to accept and treat approximately 211,000 tonnes of waste per annum. The Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) generated in the MBT will be conveyed directly to the EfW bunker where it will be mixed with commercial and industrial waste to produce a fuel. The heat produced from the combustion of the fuel will be used primarily to generate electricity of which approximately 14MW will be exported to the grid.

In addition to electricity export, up to 10MW of the heat produced in the EfW may also be used to supply potential ‘heat off-take’, which could be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

The proposed MBT will have the capacity to accept and treat up to 300,000 tonnes of waste, however it is likely to treat approximately 245,000 tonnes per year. Materials such as metals, plastics and other recyclable products will be extracted from the waste at the mechanical treatment stage using automated separation equipment and manual hand picking. The organic rich material of the waste remaining after recyclate extraction will be treated in the Bio-drying Tunnels to reduce its mass and improve the combustion characteristics of the material. Following the MBT process, any material which cannot be recycled will be conveyed to the EfW plant as a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) for recovery. All stages of the MBT operations are undertaken in purpose-designed, fully enclosed buildings, thus preventing noise, dust and smells from escaping.

The proposed EfW plant will use an incinerator with energy recovery process with a thermal capacity of 68MWTH and is expected to accept and treat approximately 211,000 tonnes of waste per annum. The Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) generated in the MBT will be conveyed directly to the EfW bunker where it will be mixed with commercial and industrial waste to produce a fuel. The heat produced from the combustion of the fuel will be used primarily to generate electricity of which approximately 14MW will be exported to the grid.

In addition to electricity export, up to 10MW of the heat produced in the EfW may also be used to supply potential ‘heat off-take’, which could be used to support a variety of local industrial/commercial or residential uses.

MBT building – 14 m
EFW building – 52 m
EFW Stack – 80 m

The site will be operational 24 hours per day seven days a week however the majority of arc21 waste is expected to be delivered from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm Saturdays. On occasion it will be necessary to deliver waste to the site outside of these hours when requested by the Authority, and this will be by prior arrangement. All Third Party Waste deliveries will run concurrently with Authority Waste deliveries.

The site will be operational 24 hours per day seven days a week however the majority of arc21 waste is expected to be delivered from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am to 2pm Saturdays. On occasion it will be necessary to deliver waste to the site outside of these hours when requested by the Authority, and this will be by prior arrangement. All Third Party Waste deliveries will run concurrently with Authority Waste deliveries.

Yes. The ash generated in the EfW will be processed on site to produce a material which can be used as an aggregate in the construction industry.

Yes. The ash generated in the EfW incineration process will be processed on site to produce a material which can be used as an aggregate in the construction industry.